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Harold Evans recalls his relationship with Count Bernadotte who was assasinated while a Mediator on a U.N. peace keeping effort, and compares him with President Abraham Lincoln as two men with conviction, faith and integrity and examples of the type of individuals people can look up to to create prosperity and peace in the world for everyone.

In this repeat broadcast, Nobel Prize winner Thomas Mann discusses the impermanent and transitory nature of life and explains why it is that this makes life special and valuable, and why mans awareness of impermanence elevates his spirit. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Hans Simons remembers his experiences in Nazi, Germany and the necessity of leaving Europe and tells how he assimilated and appreciates the diversity and freedoms of his new country.

Quentin Reynolds explains why he would first burn the Bible if he were a dictator: the Bible is the source of democracy and its stories tell of the power of individuality and non-conformity which make a dictatorship impossible, according to Reynolds.

Interview was conducted on 3/12/05 by Nakeiha Primus at the home of Louise Jordan. In addition a telephone interview took place on 3/22/05.

Lucius D. Clay describes being inspired by the German people's desire for democracy following World War II and believes that all people want peace and liberty and also believes freedom is a privilege given by God, and one that must be carefully guarded by all citizens and he calls upon Americans to make this country one that provides equal opportunities for all.

Reginald Orcutt, the Vice President for Overseas of the Mergenthaler Linotype Company, explains how he developed his own belief in humanism and believes in always being open to truth and always sharing truth.

Theodore Heubener describes how he came to believe that suffering had a purpose, either as the result of a person's transgression of the natural order of the universe, or as the basis through which one's character is formed.

Ben Burman describes his beliefs in the value of kindness, the importance of striving for artistic excellence, and the utility of humor as an anecdote to pretension and tyranny. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Holgar Johnson, President of the Institute of Life Insurance, explains the importance of adapting to change for progress, and lists some of his beliefs such as: faith in honesty of people, respect for people, the importance of compassion, taking action for one's self, and the belief in a higher power. This essay also contains an advertisement for a This I Believe LP album.

Clement Reicher recounts a short allegory he wrote as a child which formed the basis for his belief that love must be personal (not idea-driven) and unpossessive, in order to increase and lead ultimately to happiness.

Jacob Bronowski describes his simultaneous introduction to mathematics and the English language, his love that developed for both subjects, and his belief in using the mind to find truth.

Milton Katz describes how his experiences in another culture caused him to question the universal nature of his own values, but his reaction to world powers such as Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union led him to conclude that his values of freedom and justice and charity were true, after all.