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Julie Adams (also called Julia Adams) describes her decision to pursue acting, and the small inner voice that guides her through disappointments, criticism, failures, and success.

Bobby Doerr, second baseman for the Boston Red Sox, describes his belief that it is better to help his teammates through simple actions than to make a flashy play that only causes problems for the team.

Daryl Zanuck explains that the virtues he learned in his boyhood in Nebraska, charity and loyalty, are still the fundamental virtues that are most important in his life.

Maximilian Hodder describes his experiences in prewar Poland, as a prisoner sent to a Siberian concentration camp, and as an immigrant to America, and summarizes his beliefs with the conviction that humanity is more good than evil, that individuals have a right to live the life of their choice, and that he has the responsibility to work to end oppression.

Nora Laing describes the process of how she came to believe in the immortality of the soul and in a life's purpose that extended beyond fulfilling physical needs and desires.

Clyde Rogers describes his belief that everyone is interrelated and how he came to believe this after struggling with depression from which he found relief in prayer, God and a new focus on helping others.

Robert King describes how a youthful desire for an automobile led to several crimes and a stretch in jail; however, the time to reflect and the gift of a jalopy from a friend helped him change his lifestyle, and now he believes in a Supreme Being, the oneness of humanity, and the possibility that a universal language could achieve world peace.

Phyllis Parker is reminded of a saying she was fond of as a child, "love conquers all" and describes the good and sometimes bad results that have come of love. She also compares love to electricity, a flow of energy, and says that if we could all harness love and direct it wisely the world could be a much better place without prejudice. In addition, this essay contains an advertisement for a This I Believe LP album.

Pat O'Brien describes his belief in faith and prayer and the diginity of persons.

Stanley Kramer describes how a schoolteacher told him to have "the courage to be unpopular" and how that advice shaped his life and career in Hollywood.

Joseph Szigeti describes his efforts to avoid being stereotyped and remaining authentic to himself and also the obligation one has to work with and help other people.

Jack Lutz describes his belief in the three dimensions of life: height, or success; breadth, or education and culture; and depth, or faith.

Jean Hersholt describes his belief that human relationships are "problems of arithmetic"--where there are few people, individuals realize their responsibility to help their neighbors, but in crowded areas, the responsibility is passed along to someone else--and he notes that the world would be a better place if people remembered that they were in fact neighbors.

Babara Wachner describes her belief that she can "pay in advance" for life's rewards, that hardships ultimately lead to happiness and that blessings can be met without fear of loss, because they have already been earned.

Signe Hasso tells the parable of a painter attempting to create his masterpiece to describe her belief in the importance of refraining from judgement since it is impossible to know and understand the complicated events that bring a person to any moment or place in their life.

Fannie Hurst talks about the example her husband set of how to live a selfless life, and her belief that many such lights of selfless living--though small--can together illuminate an entire arena in the world.