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Norman Cousins elaborates on the play of free will and determinism in the development of people and society and the detrimental affects fear can have on this development.

Charles Parrish remembers his childhood and how his parents shaped his present belief that it is always good to help people and look for the goodness in people.

Bonaro Overstreet talks about her doubt and her one certain belief, that we must all act towards one another with good will and kindness because people are intimately connected and the notion of individuality is a misperception.

Quentin Reynolds explains why he would first burn the Bible if he were a dictator: the Bible is the source of democracy and its stories tell of the power of individuality and non-conformity which make a dictatorship impossible, according to Reynolds.

Louis Seltzer describes how he accounts to God daily for his conduct and describes his efforts to always make the best of his abilities, however limited, and to produce goodness in the world through his actions.

Margery Brown describes her beliefs in God, in the existence of a soul, in the satisfaction of contributing to life, and in the value of humility.

Caroline Duer describes most of her beliefs through a poem she wrote which emphasizes the value of enjoying simple pleasures, showing kindness and courtesy, working, avoiding excessive caution, meeting obligations, being courageous, showing tolerance, and avoiding regrets, for "the day is dark; it may be fair tomorrow." This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

C. Jared Ingersoll, Director of the Pennsylvania Railway, describes the tragic loss of his wife and son and how he persevered through tragedy to find happiness in life again as a result of his faith and belief in an afterlife and the value and enjoyment he finds from being kind and generous. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Lily Pons describes how she learned to deal with stage fright, and how an inner voice helped her persevere to become an opera singer.

Maria Trapp describes how she and her husband attempted to understand the Gospels' instructions to "become like little children"; and, observing their own children, came to the conclusion that children live whole-heartedly in the present without worrying about the past or future.

John Hughes talks about living honestly as a taxicab driver in New York City.

Daryl Zanuck explains that the virtues he learned in his boyhood in Nebraska, charity and loyalty, are still the fundamental virtues that are most important in his life.

Katherine Bottigheimer remembers an encounter with her elderly cousin Theresa and the consequent philosophy she unconsciously developed as a result: the value of hard work for the betterment of others.

President Hoover describes the importance of religious faith in life, science, and politics.

Arthur Hays speaks about his belief in freedom and the importance of democratic values and ideals to maintaining liberty.

President Hoover describes the importance of religious faith in life, science, and politics. A duplicate of this essay is on reel XTV-16923 (Box 002).

Maximilian Hodder describes his experiences in prewar Poland, as a prisoner sent to a Siberian concentration camp, and as an immigrant to America, and summarizes his beliefs with the conviction that humanity is more good than evil, that individuals have a right to live the life of their choice, and that he has the responsibility to work to end oppression.

Harlan Cleveland describes his beliefs as "ideas that Im willing to do something about" and recounts the satisfaction he derives from helping others achieve basic needs such as justice, security, and a sense of achievement.

Interview was conducted on 3/12/05 by Nakeiha Primus at the home of Louise Jordan. In addition a telephone interview took place on 3/22/05.

Edward R. Murrow introduces This I Believe to the audience and describes its purpose.

Edward Mann describes the simple truths that he believes are the root of his happines; faith in God, service to others, and friendships.

Lloyd Jordan explains why he believes man is imperishable and the importance of children to peace and happiness in the future.

Edward T. Hall, Headmaster of the Hill School at Pottstown, describes how he came to believe in the efficacy of prayer.

Robert Allman explains why losing his sight endowed him with an appreciation for life and how he learned to believe in himself and adapt and adjust to reality.

Writer Pearl S. Buck finds her faith in humanity to be stronger than ever, shares her affinity for life, and believes that cooperation can solve the worlds problems.

Lucius D. Clay describes being inspired by the German people's desire for democracy following World War II and believes that all people want peace and liberty and also believes freedom is a privilege given by God, and one that must be carefully guarded by all citizens and he calls upon Americans to make this country one that provides equal opportunities for all.

Viscount Simon describes his belief that life is like a train which must come to an end at some point during the journey, but we should not view life with dread, even if he does not believe in an afterlife.

Claude Fuess, Headmaster of Phillips Academy, describes himself as a "long-range optimist" who believes that the majority of today's boys are full of character and thoughtfulness, despite the newspaper headlines that suggest the moral decline of youth.

Waino K. Latvala, a Finnish-American, describes his experiences as an information officer fighting for Finland during the Finnish War, and how he believes that fear is a catalyst to action.

Nora Laing describes the process of how she came to believe in the immortality of the soul and in a life's purpose that extended beyond fulfilling physical needs and desires.

Frank La Forge describes his work and achievements in his career as a musician and pianist and believes in the necessity of acting to the best of one's ability and faith in God's support of one's efforts.

Paul Sabine describes how his early beliefs were fractured into those about physical realities and those about spiritual realities, but now he believes modern physics has given him the framework to harmonize his beliefs into a coherant whole.

Reginald Orcutt, the Vice President for Overseas of the Mergenthaler Linotype Company, explains how he developed his own belief in humanism and believes in always being open to truth and always sharing truth.

Clyde Rogers describes his belief that everyone is interrelated and how he came to believe this after struggling with depression from which he found relief in prayer, God and a new focus on helping others.

Theodore Heubener describes how he came to believe that suffering had a purpose, either as the result of a person's transgression of the natural order of the universe, or as the basis through which one's character is formed.

Leigh Hodges describes how his constant worry and fear changed to hope and confidence, and how he came to believe in himself and enjoy the opportunities each new day brings. Leigh Hodges describes how his constant worry and fear changed to hope and confidence, and how he came to believe in himself and enjoy the opportunities each new day brings. Leigh Hodges describes how his constant worry and fear changed to hope and confidence, and how he came to believe in himself and enjoy the opportunities each new day brings. Leigh Hodges describes how his constant worry and fear changed to hope and confidence, and how he came to believe in himself and enjoy the opportunities each new day brings.

Howard Petersen describes how children confidently believe that good will triumph over evil, and outlines his belief that we must work to make this youthful optimism a reality by learning to live in harmony with others.

Denis Brogan explains that he doesn't share the certainty or types of belief that many adherents of world religions claim, but he does believe that love is better than hate, and that the love of friends gives meaning to life.

Edith Hecht explains why she believes the world is becoming a better place and her belief that faith, as opposed to fear, will remove obstacles in times of adversity, and that the world and man were created for goodness.

Benjamin Thomas describes how his study of Abraham Lincoln helped him believe that there is a universal struggle between good and evil, and that acknowledging our own imperfections helps us to be tolerant of others.

Edmond Rieder describes how his experiences with hotel guests have established his belief in the basic goodness of people, and he believes that praticing the Golden Rule and trying his best at his endeavors has led to satisfaction.

Reverend Irvin Underhill believes that good things can come out of adversity when one keeps faith and he recalls an experience in Africa in which fear and danger led him to peace and tranquility.

Charles Bennett explains the importance of loyalty in Congress and in combat and also believes that individuals must repent for one's sins and develop strong faith to make the world a peaceful place.

Starr Daily describes how he reversed his life from one of criminal activity based upon ill will towards society to one of responsibility based upon good will. Audio also contains an advertisement for This I Believe book, Volume II.

Ralph Besse explains that he believes in God because it is the only explanation that makes sense of the world to him, and states that it is important to know God personally and work toward achieving God's purposes.

Ella Mae Howey states her belief in a personal, loving God who provides abundant life opportunities, and describes how learning to manage her condition of hearing loss taught her to believe in her power to respond positively to life's challenges.

Charles Percy explains why believes he has never met a person he did not respect, because he is open to listening and seeing who they truly are beneath the surface.

Martha Graham describes her belief that individuals learn through practice: just as learning to dance is achieved through difficult yet rewarding discipline, so life is learned through the process of living. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Hector Bolitho describes how he came to value solitude and leisure over the fear of being alone and the desire to be in constant competition with others. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Leonard Bernstein describes his belief in the importance and dignity of individuals, and in the future of America as a leader in science, art, and human progress. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

William Maners states his belief that he is the product of his thoughts, and describes his process to replace past negative thoughts with positive ones. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Lou Crandall describes his belief that hard work brings value to our accomplishments, a belief he believes that his ancestors, the founding fathers, and architects and engineers from history all shared.

Eddie Cantor states his beliefs in simple things--faith, family, and friends--and describes how giving to others has brought him personal satisfaction and reward. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Ben Burman describes his beliefs in the value of kindness, the importance of striving for artistic excellence, and the utility of humor as an anecdote to pretension and tyranny. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

William Zorach believes that people have had their faith strained and that it is important to get in touch with one's creative ability to communcate and define one's feelings in order to progress towards a world of happiness and prosperity.

Virginia Sale believes that to have a succesful and happy life it is important to do good for others in all things and to do this she tries to remember to act always as one of God's children.

Frank Dobie describes his belief in those things that make him "feel big": he believes in a supreme Being, the value of questioning to avoid blind faith, and the importance of eliminating prejudice. NOTE: This version has an abbreviated introduction, to make room to include an advertisement after the essay. Contains advertisement for a book containing 100 "This I Believe" essays. Duplicate of the essay, complete and without the advertisement, is on XTV-21312 (Box 016).

Raymond Swing, an editor for "This I Believe," describes how the realization that most of his troubles were caused by ignorance led him to become more tolerant of others, and states his beliefs in his participation in the "All-Wisdom" of God, in his responsibility to change himself, and in the importance of extending to others the love and freedom which he desires for himself. Contains a short advertisement for This I Believe book (this essay included in the book).

Irvin Stewart describes how he believes life resembles a newsreel of a football game: like the camera lens, our perspective is limited to a narrow section of the whole field, even though we are still playing a role in the greater cooperative enterprise.

Arthur Motley, president and publisher of Parade magazine, describes his expereince wathcing "Death of a Salesman" and his reaction ot the portrayal the negative portrayal of salesman and why he believes salesman and selling are synonymous with change, progress, action and is like life in miniature.

Theodore Roosevelt III describes what he believes was an unusual family life growing up--his father ensured he spent time with the children--and describes his own belief in and appreciation for the support of his wife and the value of a strong home life.

Holgar Johnson, President of the Institute of Life Insurance, explains the importance of adapting to change for progress, and lists some of his beliefs such as: faith in honesty of people, respect for people, the importance of compassion, taking action for one's self, and the belief in a higher power. This essay also contains an advertisement for a This I Believe LP album.

Dick Button, five-time World Champion, describes how, during a skating exhibition in Prague in 1948, he was showered with oranges wrapped in messages from the Czech people, messages which underscored his belief in the importance of political freedom. Audio also contains an Advertisement for This I Believe book, Volume II.

Robert King describes how a youthful desire for an automobile led to several crimes and a stretch in jail; however, the time to reflect and the gift of a jalopy from a friend helped him change his lifestyle, and now he believes in a Supreme Being, the oneness of humanity, and the possibility that a universal language could achieve world peace.

John Kelly tells the story of his disqualification from the Diamond Sculls rowing competition for having apprenticed as a bricklayer and the resulting hope to meet Beresford, the Diamond Sculls champion, in the Olympics to compete against him for the Gold Medal. Kelly concludes that he believes his failures are the most important memories he holds.

Sidney Rosenblum, Vice-president of the Enro Shirt Company, describes growing up in the only Jewish family in a small town in Tennessee; yet despite differences in religion, his family still found much in common with their community, and he believes in equality and the importance of serving others.

Nazrat Farooki, Art teacher at Punjab University, recalls her father's and grandfather's constant search for knowledge and how she now shares this passion. She also adds why she believes that learning and understanding can lead to peace and securtiy in the world.

W.C. Mullendore describes his belief that "we are here to develop the best that is within us," and how hatred impedes that goal. NOTE: This version has been abbreviated to include an advertisement after the essay. Contains advertisement for a book containing 100 "This I Believe" essays. Duplicate of the essay, complete and without the advertisement, is on XTV-18162 (Box 004).

David Richie mentions a social experiment he tried in which he behaved selfishly one week and selflessly the following, what he discovered is that he felt better when acting selflessly and he believes now that good deeds can only be accomplished through good means.

Edmund Ball describes his belief that, though he doesn't believe in a personal being who directs specific life events, there is still an overall plan to the world, and individuals must act as "trustees" to make the best use of the opportunities they have received in life.

Hugh Lyon, former Headmaster of Rugby School, talks about God and man and explains that the noble qualities of man, such as love, and vlaor and heroism, prove that he must be the children of God, and God gives life meaning and purpose. In addition, this essay contains an advertisement for a This I Believe LP album.

E.W. Ziebarth describes being challenged in high school to write out his beliefs and finds that, years later, his beliefs are just as difficult to pin down; nevertheless, he firmly believes in freedom, the worth and dignity of the individual, and the need to receive generalizations and proproganda with a healthy dose of skepticism.

Uta Hagen, winner of the Antoinette Perry Award, describes her belief that, despite being threatened and blackmailed, she has been true to herself and her beliefs in art and simple acts that bring pleasure to others. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Alfred Noyes describes his belief that the complexity of the world can only be attributed to God, and that the clearest revelation of God can be found by looking at the human soul. Contains a short advertisement for This I Believe book (this essay included in the book).

Jake Zeitlin describes his beliefs in the liberty to live one's life according to reason, in self-discipline, in the value of self-improvement through books and culture, in the importance of laughter, in the value of tempering faith in science with respect for humanity, and in the honesty of his wife and children. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Charles G. Darwin, Professor of Natural Philosophy at Edinburgh University, describes his belief that human nature (as it stands) will lead to a decline in social conditions, unless society focuses on the science of heredity. Audio also contains an advertisement for "This I Believe" book, Volume II.

Donald Day describes his beliefs in democracy, in receiving and giving creative fulfillment in marriage, in the importance of ensuring that personal success promotes the success of society, and in replacing impersonal material giving with the personal gift of service. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Elizabeth Vining describes how she used to depend on human love for meaning and satisfaction till her husband was killed in an automobile accident, and then she came to believe in God's love and the efficacy of prayer. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Ralph Bunche, 1950 Nobel Peace Prize Winner and Director of the Trusteeship Division of the United Nations, describes being raised by his grandmother Nana, and the beliefs that she passed along to him, including faith in God and the dignity of all persons. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

While reporting from Germany during Nazi rule, radio commentator William L. Shirer learned the value of tolerance and freedom and was inspired by people's ability to retain their faith and will to live in the face of attrocities. Shirer believes that mans resilience, especially during times of war, comes from having a rich inner life of reflection and contemplation.

Dag Hammarskjold, Secretary General of the United Nations, describes his beliefs in the value of self-sacrifice and service to country and humanity, in the equality of individuals, in the importance of intellectual honesty, and in the rewards of selfless love and duty. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Frank Dobie describes his belief in those things that make him "feel big": he believes in a supreme Being, the value of questioning to avoid blind faith, and the importance of eliminating prejudice. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Victor Andrade, Bolivian Ambassador to the United States, describes how he explained the concept of electricity to his son, and states his beliefs that the soul, like electricity, is an unseen force; that a moral order exists; that happiness must be based on immaterial, rather than material, means; and that all individuals are equal. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Agnes Moorehead describes her beliefs in the efficacy of prayer, the joy of self-improvement, the necessity of truth, the challenges of an acting career, and the responsibility of an individual to live an honest life. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Norbert Wiener describes his beliefs in the discipline and freedom to seek truth, in the importance of recognizing the dignity of human beings, in the difficulty of adhering to any religion, and in the role of errors during the process of discovering truth. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Elizabeth Heller describes how her experiences with receiving and giving small gifts led her to believe that giving helps people come to know one another and reduces conflict between them; this belief led her to found the "Share Your Birthday" movement in an effort to promote international peace through the act of children sharing toys with other children across the world.

Chester Bowles, Ambassador to India and Nepal and former Governor of Connecticut, describes his belief that an adequate response to the threat of the nuclear age will require cooperation from all sectors of humanity, and that the issue of world poverty must be addressed. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Francis Bolton explains how her mother's death prompted her to search for truth, and describes her beliefs that all life is part of a Universal Life, that progress and achievement come after suffering and darkness, and that human beings have evolved out of the essence of God and will ultimately be reabsorbed into God's Being. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Henry Cowell describes his belief in music as a medium through which a composer may communicate a humanizing philosophy to others, and states his beliefs in the Golden Rule, equality, indvidualism, freedom, and the responsibility to behave ethically in exchange for participation in society. Contains a short advertisement for This I Believe book (this essay included in the book).

Edith Evans describes how she believes that good is stronger than evil, that following Christ's command to love God and one's neighbors will bring about a better world, and that fear of war and social chaos can be answered by relying on the power of good to overcome.

Paul Douglas, U.S. Senator (Illinois) and Professor of Industrial Relations at the University of Chicago, describes his belief that he must work towards achieving a "fellowship of friends," spreading love and good-will in his community and the world, but that armed restistance to groups such as the Nazis and Communists is justified. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

192. The Chase

Arthur Connell, National Commander of the American Legion, describes his belief that every human being has a purpose from God and the potential to do good, and that every circumstance happens for a reason, even the death of his only daughter. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Florence Allen, Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, explains her worry over the "deterioration of the human spirit" and her belief that faith and intelligence and the fair application of law may restore the human spirit and through law create a peacful planet. Audio includes an advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Phillip Read, Chairman of the Board at General Electric, describes his belief that, even if life continues after death, individuals should still work to make the most of their time on earth, striving to achieve excellence in their activities and to experience the joy that comes from serving others. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Adlai Stevenson, Governor of Illinois, describes his beliefs in generosity, in liberty, in the rights of man, in God's goodness and protection, in liberalism, in individualism, in freedom of conscience, in diversity and the right to dissent, and in open-mindedness. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Arthur Deakin, General Secretary of the Transport and General Workers' Union, states his beliefs both in an individual's responsibility to serve others and in the individual's right to freedom of conscience and expression. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Conyers Read enumerates some of his beliefs, such as the ability to concern one's self only with that which one can control; the importance of creative abilities and freedom of thought; and standards of right and wrong. Audio also includes an advertisement for a "This I Believe" book.

Walter Agard, Professor of Classics at the University of Wisconsin and former President of the American Classical League, describes his boyhood practice of gazing at the stars, enthralled by the universal order they represented, and states his beliefs in justice, equality, human achievement in the arts and literature, diversity, tolerance, and the value of education. Audio also contains an Advertisement for This I Believe book, Volume II.

Edgar William "Billy" Ingram describes his belief that humans need companionship, that life has a purpose, and that success and happiness come through contributing to the sum of human achievement. Audio contains an advertisement for the LP release of "This I Believe" essays. Edgar William "Billy" Ingram describes his belief that humans need companionship, that life has a purpose, and that success and happiness come through contributing to the sum of human achievement.

Stan Kenton is concerned with the development of humanity and he describes the need for growth and change for positive development to progress in all aspects of a person's life and also explains that everyone participates and contributes something to the development of humanity and his contributions and own developments are through music. This essay also contains an advertisement for a This I Believe LP album.