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Wallace Stegner describes his suspicions of "passionate faith" because of the religious intolerance it creates, and recounts his beliefs in virtues such as kindness and courage, and his belief that although consciences are developed differently, based on one's birthplace, nevertheless, people across the world share many values.

William Joyce, founder of Joyce Incorporated, Shoe Manufacturers, describes how the deaths of his brother and son led him to conclude that he could only have faith in God's purposes rather than demand an explanation of His actions.

Elinor Gene Hoffman describes her belief in what Quakers call the "inner light," and how that belief led her to give up an unsatisfying career in theatre to pursue the "inner light" more fully.

Harry Dietrich describes how his family background, his teachers, and the tools and techniques invented by doctors of previous generations have all equipped him to achieve healing more effectively than ever before, and his belief that his responsibility is to help dispel fear in his patients.

George Killion remembers his father and the beliefs his farther imparted to him: compassion, respect for others, and adherence to the Golden Rule. George Killion remembers his father and the beliefs his farther imparted to him: compassion, respect for others, and adherence to the Golden Rule.

Robert Cleland, head of the Research Group of the Huntington Library, describes a time in his life in which he was distraught and took a trip along the Colorado river with friends. The beauty he saw during the trip, Robert Cleland says, reinspired his life and faith.

Alfred Nilson describes how, as a harvester in California, the only way to keep his balance while traveling on foot along the railroad ties was to focus his eyes on the distance, and he explains how this lesson in farsightedness has helped him to balance the rest of his life.

Jean Hersholt describes his belief that human relationships are "problems of arithmetic"--where there are few people, individuals realize their responsibility to help their neighbors, but in crowded areas, the responsibility is passed along to someone else--and he notes that the world would be a better place if people remembered that they were in fact neighbors.

Babara Wachner describes her belief that she can "pay in advance" for life's rewards, that hardships ultimately lead to happiness and that blessings can be met without fear of loss, because they have already been earned.

Gerald Heard describes his perspectives on moral laws and the freedoms we must obtain to achieve true contentment in our life, free of fears and anxiety.