Search

Search Results

Lewis Hoskins recalls a time when he was taken prisoner by a chinese soldier while providing humanitarian aid and his ability to find a common humanity and brotherliness with his captor that disarmed the fear and violence of the situation.

Harold Evans recalls his relationship with Count Bernadotte who was assasinated while a Mediator on a U.N. peace keeping effort, and compares him with President Abraham Lincoln as two men with conviction, faith and integrity and examples of the type of individuals people can look up to to create prosperity and peace in the world for everyone.

Albert Nesbitt describes how his successful life as a manufacturer left him feeling dissatisfied; it wasn't until he began to apply the Golden Rule, to engage with his factory union workers as people with legitimate points of view, and become involved in YMCA service, that the emptiness left him as he practiced what he calls Christian principles. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Dimitri Mitropolous describes two experiences, that led him to his belief that talent and celebrity should be used to help others.

Bill Sears talks about his belief in the importance of developing faith and a moral character to live life to its fullest potential and greatest happiness.

Elmer Bobst, President of Warner-Hudnut Incorporated, describes his 82-year-old friend Bernard Baruch, and describes his belief that long life and happiness are achieved through the act of remaining productive, even after retirement.

Ralph Richmond talks about his illness and the recovery that gave him a new, fresh perspective on his life.

C. Jared Ingersoll, Director of the Pennsylvania Railway, describes the tragic loss of his wife and son and how he persevered through tragedy to find happiness in life again as a result of his faith and belief in an afterlife and the value and enjoyment he finds from being kind and generous. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Edward R. Murrow introduces This I Believe to the audience and describes its purpose.

Edward Mann describes the simple truths that he believes are the root of his happines; faith in God, service to others, and friendships.

Robert Allman explains why losing his sight endowed him with an appreciation for life and how he learned to believe in himself and adapt and adjust to reality.

Leigh Hodges describes how his constant worry and fear changed to hope and confidence, and how he came to believe in himself and enjoy the opportunities each new day brings. Leigh Hodges describes how his constant worry and fear changed to hope and confidence, and how he came to believe in himself and enjoy the opportunities each new day brings. Leigh Hodges describes how his constant worry and fear changed to hope and confidence, and how he came to believe in himself and enjoy the opportunities each new day brings. Leigh Hodges describes how his constant worry and fear changed to hope and confidence, and how he came to believe in himself and enjoy the opportunities each new day brings.

Howard Petersen describes how children confidently believe that good will triumph over evil, and outlines his belief that we must work to make this youthful optimism a reality by learning to live in harmony with others.

Edith Hecht explains why she believes the world is becoming a better place and her belief that faith, as opposed to fear, will remove obstacles in times of adversity, and that the world and man were created for goodness.

Reverend Irvin Underhill believes that good things can come out of adversity when one keeps faith and he recalls an experience in Africa in which fear and danger led him to peace and tranquility.

Theodore Roosevelt III describes what he believes was an unusual family life growing up--his father ensured he spent time with the children--and describes his own belief in and appreciation for the support of his wife and the value of a strong home life.

John Kelly tells the story of his disqualification from the Diamond Sculls rowing competition for having apprenticed as a bricklayer and the resulting hope to meet Beresford, the Diamond Sculls champion, in the Olympics to compete against him for the Gold Medal. Kelly concludes that he believes his failures are the most important memories he holds.

David Richie mentions a social experiment he tried in which he behaved selfishly one week and selflessly the following, what he discovered is that he felt better when acting selflessly and he believes now that good deeds can only be accomplished through good means.

Elizabeth Vining describes how she used to depend on human love for meaning and satisfaction till her husband was killed in an automobile accident, and then she came to believe in God's love and the efficacy of prayer. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Bennet Schauffler talks about the importance of keeping active in order to find happiness, that if one enjoys what one is doing and works at it one has no time, or inclination, to argue or fight with others. boredom and inactivity have led people to conflict and materialistic greed.

Curtin Winsor tells of the importance of individualism and being true to himself in the development of his beliefs and what some of those beliefs are.

Frederick Thayer considers the many different philosophies and belief systems in the world and arrives at the conclusion that people would be better off focusing on their present life and conduct rather than on their afterlife.

Joseph Klacsman describes his simple faith and the happiness he derives from serving a wide variety of passengers during his work as a Pullman conductor.

Alfred Williams, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia and former dean and trustee of the Wharton School of Finance at the University of Pennsylvania, explains his belief that we all perceive the world differently and so we need to try to approach one another with empathy, respect, and compassion, and that this attitude is particularly important in the American business world where people spend such a great deal of time and attention.

Eric Warner Johnson describes his beliefs in the freedom of conscience, in the brotherhood of humanity, in the importance of living one's faith in practical action, and in the value of speaking the truth, even at personal risk. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

George Beitzel describes the need for the individual to live a christian life and how this will result in greater peace and happiness throught out the world.

Edward Toland describes how his experiences with a French mobile field hospital in WWI changed his perspective and led him to become a teacher after the war, and he describes his belief that loving humanity by practicing the Golden Rule is the best way in which to love God.

Dorothy Thomas explains why she feels it is important to find a balance in life that allows one to be happy and appreciative of life and lists the many simple pleasures she finds in life that make her happy.

Harry Levenson relates his experience as a musician to the struggles of people in the world and explains his belief that doing ones best and appreciating the the individual as a perosn can guide us towards a peaceful future.

Henderson Suplee talks about the importance of opportunity in life and achieving harmony.

Paul French, Executive Director of Cooperative for American Remittances to Europe (CARE Inc), remembers the lasting impression his mothers words, "Youll never be able to fool thyself, and Take thy job seriously but never thyself made on him and the affect these sentiments had on his life to obey his conscience, respect people and help others.

Charles Hires, Chairman of the board of the Charles E. Hires Company of Philadelphia, tells of his habit to throw himself into work and cut off relationships in response to the death of his wife and the realization that he was doing so in error and that happiness comes through helping and interacting with others.

Van Horn Ely, Jr., explains his belief in the goodness of people and his efforts, based on the story of Moses and the Ten Commandments, to be open and honest in all of his interactions with other people.

Burton Fowler states that the fundamental principles of his beliefs--God, Jesus Christ, and the brotherhood of humanity--derive from his early years on an upstate New York farm.