Search

Search Results

General Hershey laments society's fascination with technological progress and opines that society would be better off if people focused on understanding themselves, others around them and their relationships with one another.

Lewis Hoskins recalls a time when he was taken prisoner by a chinese soldier while providing humanitarian aid and his ability to find a common humanity and brotherliness with his captor that disarmed the fear and violence of the situation.

Pat Frank describes his experiences as a war correspondent with Edward R. Murrow during World War II; explains how his interactions with Germans, Japanese, and Italians give him hope that people share a fundamental humanity; and notes that the chance to watch history unfold is a great opportunity and responsibility, despite the uncertainty of the era.

Lord Birkett explains that, despite his firsthand experiences at the Nuremberg Trials, he still has faith in the inherent goodness of people and their ability to progress towards a peaceful future.

Anne Rombeau describes her belief in the unity of nature and humanity, with each piece contributing as it freely chooses, and recounts an experience in which she overcame a physical ailment to continue her life of travel and flying. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Charles Abrams tells of his faith in man despite his frequent uncertainty when confronted with the realities of war, greed and other instances of human weakness. However, he remains devoted to the ability of man to rely on his conscience to someday improve and perfect the world in which we live.

Newbold Morris describes the American spirit and howthat spirit is exemplified though progressive, democratic values and their corresponding government programs.

Genevieve B. Earle remembers the surprise of seeing poverty as a child and how she developed a belief in the benefits of a strong government to promote laws and provide for its citizens although she says that can only happen when the people are engaged as active, equal partners in the work of a city.

Jonathan Daniels, editor of the News and Observer, relates a story from his religious upbrining about the remarkable testimonials told in his religious community and explains that equality of all men before God is what drew him to the Episcopalian Church.

Roger Ansell, associate editor of Holiday Magazine, describes his belief in the need for skepticism rather than arrogant certainty, in his hope that civilization will advance through the current anxious age, in the importance of seeing society's maturation as a point yet to come in the future, in the realization of the humanity of others, and in the refreshing openness of children.

Robert Heinlein talks about his beliefs in his neighbors--in their kindness and willingness to look out for each other, despite differences in opinions or creeds.

Upton Sinclair describes the military (Navy) and religious (Episcopalian) background of his family, and his own choice to defend his country and bring change through his writing.

Gilbert Murray describes the religious importance of poetry in his life and how his experiences in WWI guided his efforts to prevent future war.

Ralph "Babe" Pinelli describes his beliefs in the importance of God, a strong marriage and family, religious training that starts in the home, a country that supports freedom of conscience, and baseball.

Liberal Member of Parliament for the Isle of Anglesey (1929-1951) and Deputy Leader of the British Liberal Party (1949-1951), Megan Lloyd George states how her generation, which grew up during WWI, has never known true peace, and describes her belief that one's perspective will never be quite accurate with a spiritual component.

Gene Harris describes his belief that following "natural laws" in one's daily life will help build a "storm-proof philosophic anchorage."

J. Arthur Rank expressees his faith in God and humanity and the power of faith to transform the world in to a peaceful society.

Malcolm Muggeridge, Editor of Punch Magazine, talks about the immutability, or changelessness, of life and imperfection of the human condition; however, he emphasizes the need to accept the imperfection and permanence and appreciate life for what it is and not what one hopes it may be one day.

Alfred Landon describes his belief in the ability of people to achieve monumental progress for society, and in the need to maintain a grasp of spiritual and moral truths in the midst of that progress.

Osceola Dawson describes her beliefs in the fatherhood of God, the brotherhood and equality of humanity, the Bible as the "infallible guide to conduct," and the home as "the foundation of society."

Margaret Hickey recalls her childhood when her father read the Bible to the famiy, and describes how her faith must be an active one of service.

Dr. Saul's beliefs are shaped by his experiences in science and he describes his conviction that the fight-or-flight reaction and suffering in childhood can lead to developmental problems as adults; modern society must focus its energy on developing emotionally mature adults for future harmony.

In a recording aired posthumously, Samuel Shellabarger describes his beliefs in his dependence upon God for eternal life, in the existence of natural laws that govern values and morality, and in the value of using the past to inform future decisions.

Harold Stassen describes Albert Schweitzer's life and his philosophy of "reverance for life," and from this explains why people yearn for freedom and dictatorships can never stop this yearning.

Harold Evans recalls his relationship with Count Bernadotte who was assasinated while a Mediator on a U.N. peace keeping effort, and compares him with President Abraham Lincoln as two men with conviction, faith and integrity and examples of the type of individuals people can look up to to create prosperity and peace in the world for everyone.

Clyde Hoey, former North Carolina U.S. Senator and Governor, describes how his faith in God helped him to overcome childhood fears of walking home in the dark, and supported him through life's challenges, a happy marriage, and the death of his spouse.

Lou Crandall uses the analogy of construction to describe his belief that young people are foundations upon which a strong, straight character must be built, and looks to Biblical characters for examples of steadfast integrity.

Percy Spender, Australian ambassador to the United States, explains how and why it is important for people to consider the future one is leaving for the following generation and that it is our duty to create a better world, in which they can live without fear, for the next generation.

Helen Keller describes her faith in God, in immortality, and in her fellow human beings, as well as her confidence that social conditions are improving, despite the present sufferings of humanity. Helen Keller describes her faith in God, in immortality, and in her fellow human beings, as well as her confidence that social conditions are improving, despite the present sufferings of humanity. Helen Keller describes her faith in God, in immortality, and in her fellow human beings, as well as her confidence that social conditions are improving, despite the present sufferings of humanity. Helen Keller describes her faith in God, in immortality, and in her fellow human beings, as well as her confidence that social conditions are improving, despite the present sufferings of humanity.

Charles Taft talks about God's love and the necessity to strive to be worthy of his love but understanding one's imperfections as well, and how he tries to connect the sublime with the more practical aspects of life through hard work and introspection.

Albert Nesbitt describes how his successful life as a manufacturer left him feeling dissatisfied; it wasn't until he began to apply the Golden Rule, to engage with his factory union workers as people with legitimate points of view, and become involved in YMCA service, that the emptiness left him as he practiced what he calls Christian principles. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Dick Powell talks of the simple adages that have shaped his views of life, and his faith and describes his desire to pass them on to his children.

David Levy, Deputy District Attorney of Contra Costa County in California, describes how he learned level-headed contentment in order to survive as a POW on the Death March of Bataan during WWII.

Ahmad Zaki Abu Shadi describes his belief in freedom and justice, first developed through books, and then strengthened through his own life experiences that caused him to leave Egypt and ultimately move to the United States.

In this repeat broadcast, Nobel Prize winner Thomas Mann discusses the impermanent and transitory nature of life and explains why it is that this makes life special and valuable, and why mans awareness of impermanence elevates his spirit. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Constance Warren discusses the importance of education to happiness and ethics and describes the values that have made her life a happy one.

Harry Overstreet describes how Socrates has influenced his thinking, leading to the beliefs that truth must be sought out (rather than accepted) and that knowledge about the world can never be exhausted, and forming the foundation for his tolerant acceptance of his fellow human beings.

Fred Fagg recalls a moment when his life was saved by a handhold at the edge of a cliff and uses this story to explain the importance of his own "spiritual handholds."

Professor of Surgery at the University of Minnesota and Surgeon at the Mayo Clinic of Rochester, Dr. Mayo tells of his belief in a purpose to everything in life; the need for compassion and respect for other people; how science supports his faith and belief in the immaterial; our responsibility to help others; and the value of humor in life.

Lee Bristol describes his belief in the individual, the individual's role in achieving peace and acquiring happiness through humor, service to others, and faith.

Charles Duveen, Jr. describes his experience of being shot from a plane while flying over the Pacific durinig WWII, and how his perspective on life changed from one which placed value in material objects to one which found value in service to others.

Dimitri Mitropolous describes two experiences, that led him to his belief that talent and celebrity should be used to help others.

Lillian McCue (pseudonym Lillian De La Torre) describes how growing up in a family of seven children shaped her beliefs that she must carry her own weight in the world, that being angry only hurt herself, that it is important to be needed, and that happiness is a habit. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Wilson Compton describes the influence of his Presbyterian parents on his beliefs (including his mother's child-rearing philosophy of "The Bible, soap, and spinach"), and he explains how the Golden Rule is a concept found in all of the major world religions.

Meredith Willson remembers his friend Max Terr to explain why one does not need to be famous in order to leave their mark on the world.

Ruth Cranston describes how a period of questioning and her world travels helped her to develop a set of beliefs which she found common to all religions: the unity of life; the interdependence of humanity; and the need to love and serve others, protect the weak, and live a non-violent life.

Carroll Binder relates his personal tragedies and the principles he relies on to avoid cynicism and maintain the enjoyment of life through adversity.

Edward Morgan talks about the importance of underastanding one's self and compassion for humanity to achieving a greater understanding and appreciation of life and beauty.

Joseph Harsch describes his beliefs in the value of always moving forward (rather than stagnating) and in the importance of helping others.

J. George Frederick uses the analogy of the heart's cardiovascular system to describe his beliefs in the need to love, to forgive, and to sacrifice for others.