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Osceola Dawson describes her beliefs in the fatherhood of God, the brotherhood and equality of humanity, the Bible as the "infallible guide to conduct," and the home as "the foundation of society."

In a recording aired posthumously, Samuel Shellabarger describes his beliefs in his dependence upon God for eternal life, in the existence of natural laws that govern values and morality, and in the value of using the past to inform future decisions.

Albert Nesbitt describes how his successful life as a manufacturer left him feeling dissatisfied; it wasn't until he began to apply the Golden Rule, to engage with his factory union workers as people with legitimate points of view, and become involved in YMCA service, that the emptiness left him as he practiced what he calls Christian principles. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Arthur Motley, president and publisher of Parade magazine, describes his expereince wathcing "Death of a Salesman" and his reaction ot the portrayal the negative portrayal of salesman and why he believes salesman and selling are synonymous with change, progress, action and is like life in miniature.

Francis Bolton explains how her mother's death prompted her to search for truth, and describes her beliefs that all life is part of a Universal Life, that progress and achievement come after suffering and darkness, and that human beings have evolved out of the essence of God and will ultimately be reabsorbed into God's Being. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Monroe Deustch expresses his belief that the sentiment of brotherhood between people could solve many of the world's problems and also expresses his belief that there is a greater power in the world that has created the Universe and that this power is immortal just as the spirit of people is immortal as well.

David Maxwell-Fyfe describes his beliefs in the faith of a romantic--a faith with the conviction and idealism to address the problems of the age and which recognizes humanity's need for spiritual advancement, in addition to scientific and material advancement.

The essence of Louise Miller's philosophy is that heaven is around us and at the "center of man" and explains how she cultivates this in herself through meditation and the outcomes, particualrly in relations with others, she finds.

Mary Belden, president and treasurer of Belden Frosting Company, describes her beliefs in the brotherhood of individuals, the need for tolerance, the importance of listening to the other side of an argument, the dignity of human beings, the need to remember the past, and her confidence that Christianity will triumph over other philosophies, dispelling fear and uncertainty.

Roger Phillips, publisher of World Magazine, describes the faith and values he inherited from his family and explains the value and influence of a mate and examines the many elements that make up a persons heritage.