Search

Search Results

Lord Birkett explains that, despite his firsthand experiences at the Nuremberg Trials, he still has faith in the inherent goodness of people and their ability to progress towards a peaceful future.

Gilbert Murray describes the religious importance of poetry in his life and how his experiences in WWI guided his efforts to prevent future war.

Harry Overstreet describes how Socrates has influenced his thinking, leading to the beliefs that truth must be sought out (rather than accepted) and that knowledge about the world can never be exhausted, and forming the foundation for his tolerant acceptance of his fellow human beings.

Grove Patterson describes his belief in a Supreme Power who created the universe, in immortality, in the efficacy of prayer, in the existence of natural law, in the existence of evil caused by humans, and in the courage to face rather than withdraw from the world's problems.

Viscount Simon describes his belief that life is like a train which must come to an end at some point during the journey, but we should not view life with dread, even if he does not believe in an afterlife.

Elizabeth Vining describes how she used to depend on human love for meaning and satisfaction till her husband was killed in an automobile accident, and then she came to believe in God's love and the efficacy of prayer. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Francis Bolton explains how her mother's death prompted her to search for truth, and describes her beliefs that all life is part of a Universal Life, that progress and achievement come after suffering and darkness, and that human beings have evolved out of the essence of God and will ultimately be reabsorbed into God's Being. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

William James describes how an experience during World War II gave him a belief in his dependence on God and an appreciation for life, and how he strives to be sensitive to others' beliefs and avoid speaking unkindly to them.

Sylvester Long recounts his experiences growing up in an Ohio farming family, and describes his belief that he is merely a "window" through which to reveal God's light to others and God's "subcontractor" whose work is done ultimately for and with God.

Ernest Melby talks about his belief in the individuality of people and the need for freedom and liberty in order for people to develop to the greatest potential.