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Theodore Heubener describes how he came to believe that suffering had a purpose, either as the result of a person's transgression of the natural order of the universe, or as the basis through which one's character is formed.

George Sokolsky talks about his experience abroad and how the experience affected his philosophy of life, politics, and religion.

Harold Clurman describes how difficult the theater field was during the Great Depression, but expresses his love and motivations for being in theater and his desire to serve others.

Walden Pell describes his belief that life is an "educational enterprise" filled with teachers who must be sure that they are passing along the truth to the next generation.

Everett Case describes his belief in Socrates' "examined life," and the role of the humanities in helping an individual discern and protect justice.

Paul Moser remembers the order and discipline expected of him as a child, and how the virtue of work can be applied to society, guided by Christian values, to create order out of a chaotic and confusing world.

Van Horn Ely, Jr., explains his belief in the goodness of people and his efforts, based on the story of Moses and the Ten Commandments, to be open and honest in all of his interactions with other people.