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Dimitri Mitropolous describes two experiences, that led him to his belief that talent and celebrity should be used to help others.

W. David Curtiss describes how his well-laid life plans were interrupted by WWII, and how the uncertainty of war taught him to accept change, not with resignation, but with a spirit of adventure.

Howard Spalding describes his belief in a divine spark that exists within every person and which spurs creative invention and moral reasoning, and states his belief that happiness is achieved through the ability to use creative intelligence in the service of others.

Senator Lehman describes his two basic beliefs: First, one should give back to society according to what he or she has received, and secondly, one should extend respect to the opinions and beliefs of others.

Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and poet Paul Mowrer describes the importance of faith and hope to his beliefes, which include first hand experiences of both the good and bad that people can do.

Theodore Heubener describes how he came to believe that suffering had a purpose, either as the result of a person's transgression of the natural order of the universe, or as the basis through which one's character is formed.

Hector Bolitho describes how he came to value solitude and leisure over the fear of being alone and the desire to be in constant competition with others. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Arthur Motley, president and publisher of Parade magazine, describes his expereince wathcing "Death of a Salesman" and his reaction ot the portrayal the negative portrayal of salesman and why he believes salesman and selling are synonymous with change, progress, action and is like life in miniature.

Victor Andrade, Bolivian Ambassador to the United States, describes how he explained the concept of electricity to his son, and states his beliefs that the soul, like electricity, is an unseen force; that a moral order exists; that happiness must be based on immaterial, rather than material, means; and that all individuals are equal. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Thelma Mills desribes her philosophy of social service, as well as her beliefs in the personality of Jesus Christ, God's eternal purpose for the universe, and her own role in living out that purpose by serving others.

George Sokolsky talks about his experience abroad and how the experience affected his philosophy of life, politics, and religion.

Lee DuBridge describes his beliefs in science, both what can be understood now, and what will be explained as civilization progresses toward the future.

Milton Katz describes how his experiences in another culture caused him to question the universal nature of his own values, but his reaction to world powers such as Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union led him to conclude that his values of freedom and justice and charity were true, after all.

Harold Clurman describes how difficult the theater field was during the Great Depression, but expresses his love and motivations for being in theater and his desire to serve others.

Edward Sherman emphasizes the need for responsibility and sacrifice for the sake of the country and to preserve its leadership in the world, and lists his personal commandments, a "Decalogue of Civic Responsibility."

Ronald Kurtz, Electronic Technician in the United States Navy, describes many of his beliefs; his optimism for the future, the value of courage, the beauty of nature and God, reasons for his sentimnetal nature, and his connection to family.

Edward Toland describes how his experiences with a French mobile field hospital in WWI changed his perspective and led him to become a teacher after the war, and he describes his belief that loving humanity by practicing the Golden Rule is the best way in which to love God.

Alfred Nilson describes how, as a harvester in California, the only way to keep his balance while traveling on foot along the railroad ties was to focus his eyes on the distance, and he explains how this lesson in farsightedness has helped him to balance the rest of his life.

Antonio Iglesias describes how his three ideals--the search for truth, a love for beauty, and a reverence for goodness--have offered him strength, certainty and motivation to pursue life despite depression, physical handicaps, suffering, loneliness, and moral indifference.

Signe Hasso tells the parable of a painter attempting to create his masterpiece to describe her belief in the importance of refraining from judgement since it is impossible to know and understand the complicated events that bring a person to any moment or place in their life.