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Charles Abrams tells of his faith in man despite his frequent uncertainty when confronted with the realities of war, greed and other instances of human weakness. However, he remains devoted to the ability of man to rely on his conscience to someday improve and perfect the world in which we live.

Lou Crandall uses the analogy of construction to describe his belief that young people are foundations upon which a strong, straight character must be built, and looks to Biblical characters for examples of steadfast integrity.

Lee Bristol describes his belief in the individual, the individual's role in achieving peace and acquiring happiness through humor, service to others, and faith.

Bentz Plagemann describes his experience in the Navy during WWII and the resulting belief that with patience and faith there are no difficulties one cannot overcome in life.

Mr. and Mrs. Hale, having been married for a long time, talk of the imminent death that will separate them as they age, and inspite of the expected grief they will continue to see life with excitement and wonder, and remind all of the importance to have compassion for everyone.

Douglas Fairbanks describes his fathers resistance to his acting career, and difficulties starting his political carreer and how he overcame obstacles through his determination.

Enseng Ho lecture entitled Burial and Travel: Islam across Indian Ocean Cultures.

Quentin Reynolds explains why he would first burn the Bible if he were a dictator: the Bible is the source of democracy and its stories tell of the power of individuality and non-conformity which make a dictatorship impossible, according to Reynolds.

Interview conducted on 2/13/05 by Sam Stiegler at Oscar Greene's home in West Medford.

Frank La Forge describes his work and achievements in his career as a musician and pianist and believes in the necessity of acting to the best of one's ability and faith in God's support of one's efforts.

Theodore Heubener describes how he came to believe that suffering had a purpose, either as the result of a person's transgression of the natural order of the universe, or as the basis through which one's character is formed.

Leonard Bernstein describes his belief in the importance and dignity of individuals, and in the future of America as a leader in science, art, and human progress. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Arthur Motley, president and publisher of Parade magazine, describes his expereince wathcing "Death of a Salesman" and his reaction ot the portrayal the negative portrayal of salesman and why he believes salesman and selling are synonymous with change, progress, action and is like life in miniature.

Victor Andrade, Bolivian Ambassador to the United States, describes how he explained the concept of electricity to his son, and states his beliefs that the soul, like electricity, is an unseen force; that a moral order exists; that happiness must be based on immaterial, rather than material, means; and that all individuals are equal. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Ernest Melby talks about his belief in the individuality of people and the need for freedom and liberty in order for people to develop to the greatest potential.

George Haynes, executive director of the National Urban League, describes his beliefs in the equal potential of humans, in beauty, truth, goodness, peace, life, God, and eternity.

Rubin Gotesky relates an experience of feeling part of yet aloof from the universe, and describes his belief that though isolation is an essential part of the self, his actions do matter and can help to change the world.

Milton Katz describes how his experiences in another culture caused him to question the universal nature of his own values, but his reaction to world powers such as Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union led him to conclude that his values of freedom and justice and charity were true, after all.

John Sinclair, president of the National Industrial Conference Board, describes his belief that faith in an immortal soul, prayer, knowledge of the truth, and humility will help him overcome discouragement, cynicism, and the fear of death.

John Gassner describes his abhorrence of dogma and his belief that humanism is the belief system that can enable humanity to make scientific progress without destroying itself.

Bennet Schauffler talks about the importance of keeping active in order to find happiness, that if one enjoys what one is doing and works at it one has no time, or inclination, to argue or fight with others. boredom and inactivity have led people to conflict and materialistic greed.

Joseph Klacsman describes his simple faith and the happiness he derives from serving a wide variety of passengers during his work as a Pullman conductor.

Mary Belden, president and treasurer of Belden Frosting Company, describes her beliefs in the brotherhood of individuals, the need for tolerance, the importance of listening to the other side of an argument, the dignity of human beings, the need to remember the past, and her confidence that Christianity will triumph over other philosophies, dispelling fear and uncertainty.

Harold Clurman describes how difficult the theater field was during the Great Depression, but expresses his love and motivations for being in theater and his desire to serve others.

Louis Wehle describes the concept of spiritual perfection, and while this goal may be unattainable, the pursuit is worthwhile, and this is the only effort that can give true and enduring satisfaction.

Lawrence Schoonover describes his experiment with ethics in his youth and his questioning of the relevance of the Ten Commandments. He then recounts the awareness of his mistake and how he lives by them and raises his children according to them.

Edwin Lukas speaks about the importance of tolerance and respect for other people, cultures and races and the negative impact prejudice can have on an individual and a community.

Frank Koegler, Executive Vice President of Doehler-Jarvis, describes how he was forced to accept responsibility at an early age because of the death of his father, and how he came to view responsibility as a privilege rather than an obligation.

Lucile Watson recounts her childhood discovery of the knowledge that she could change herself for the better, and, after successes with simple things such as maintaining her hair and quitting nail-biting, she developed a philosophy for life, including a belief that God was in everything and made everything.

Howard Henderson describes how a series of failures and challenges during his early life and career revealed to him an inner strength and resiliance, and describes his belief that a person's strength comes from being part of a greater whole - family, community, world, or God.

Signe Hasso tells the parable of a painter attempting to create his masterpiece to describe her belief in the importance of refraining from judgement since it is impossible to know and understand the complicated events that bring a person to any moment or place in their life.

Burton Fowler states that the fundamental principles of his beliefs--God, Jesus Christ, and the brotherhood of humanity--derive from his early years on an upstate New York farm.

Fannie Hurst talks about the example her husband set of how to live a selfless life, and her belief that many such lights of selfless living--though small--can together illuminate an entire arena in the world.