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Sidonie Gruenberg describes her belief in the importance of both family life and productive occupation outside the home, and recounts how she balanced those values in her own life.

Edward Sherman emphasizes the need for responsibility and sacrifice for the sake of the country and to preserve its leadership in the world, and lists his personal commandments, a "Decalogue of Civic Responsibility."

Robert Colwell describes his belief that a free society starts with personal responsibility, and he quotes theologian Martin Luther's description of two kinds of faith--one can either hold beliefs that are passive or beliefs that lead to action.

Frieda Gates discusses how her work as a librarian allows her to help others educate themselves and the importance of tolerance and respect for others views.

Kenneth Johnson talks of the importance of democracy, freedom and human welfare, and emphasizes the ethical principles that underlie our democratic ideals.

Hilda Yoder describes how she used to emphasize marriage and financial security, only to lose both her husband and home; she describes how she found purpose and healing in serving others; and she states her beliefs in virtues of kindness, forgiveness, simplicity, and humilty that are still practiced by children (and should be practiced by adults).

Louis Wehle describes the concept of spiritual perfection, and while this goal may be unattainable, the pursuit is worthwhile, and this is the only effort that can give true and enduring satisfaction.

Ronald Kurtz, Electronic Technician in the United States Navy, describes many of his beliefs; his optimism for the future, the value of courage, the beauty of nature and God, reasons for his sentimnetal nature, and his connection to family.

Walter Rothschild, President of Abraham & Straus, describes his belief in the need to allow human beings to develop their unique potential, the necessity of helping others, the importance of discipline, and the need to guide rather than dominate chidren; finally, he describes the contentment he derives from sailing at sea.

Lawrence Schoonover describes his experiment with ethics in his youth and his questioning of the relevance of the Ten Commandments. He then recounts the awareness of his mistake and how he lives by them and raises his children according to them.