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Edward Toland describes how his experiences with a French mobile field hospital in WWI changed his perspective and led him to become a teacher after the war, and he describes his belief that loving humanity by practicing the Golden Rule is the best way in which to love God.

Edwin Lukas speaks about the importance of tolerance and respect for other people, cultures and races and the negative impact prejudice can have on an individual and a community.

Frank Koegler, Executive Vice President of Doehler-Jarvis, describes how he was forced to accept responsibility at an early age because of the death of his father, and how he came to view responsibility as a privilege rather than an obligation.

Alfred Nilson describes how, as a harvester in California, the only way to keep his balance while traveling on foot along the railroad ties was to focus his eyes on the distance, and he explains how this lesson in farsightedness has helped him to balance the rest of his life.

Kenneth Boulding explains that as a quaker and an economist he understands that pure scientific knowledge is important but meaningless if unaccompanied by an appreciation for the intuitive and spiritual side of life, which he experiecnes through prayer and contemplation.

Dorothy Thomas explains why she feels it is important to find a balance in life that allows one to be happy and appreciative of life and lists the many simple pleasures she finds in life that make her happy.

Stanley Isaacs talks about his dedication and enthusiasm for politics and civic engagement and expresses how his faith in judaism supports his beliefs in democratic values like liberty and individuality.

Dr. Subodh Chandra Roy describes how his life changed when he became blind at age seven, and states his belief that suffering can cause personal growth.

Col. Ralph K. Strassman describes his belief in the importance of human beings, and the enduring persistence of human personality, despite the failures and fears of the present age.

Robb Sagendorph, publisher of "Yankee" magazine and the "Old Farmer's Almanac", describes how his beliefs have deepened since he was young, and states his beliefs that humans are made significant because of their relationship to God, that life is everlasting, and that children have a closer understanding of life than adults.

Sidney Wallach describes his belief in the golden mean, reasonableness, democracy, and the protection of the minority, especially the individual.

Harry Levenson relates his experience as a musician to the struggles of people in the world and explains his belief that doing ones best and appreciating the the individual as a perosn can guide us towards a peaceful future.

Everett Case describes his belief in Socrates' "examined life," and the role of the humanities in helping an individual discern and protect justice.

Antonio Iglesias describes how his three ideals--the search for truth, a love for beauty, and a reverence for goodness--have offered him strength, certainty and motivation to pursue life despite depression, physical handicaps, suffering, loneliness, and moral indifference.

Paul Moser remembers the order and discipline expected of him as a child, and how the virtue of work can be applied to society, guided by Christian values, to create order out of a chaotic and confusing world.

Mae E. Andrews describes how her faith in God sustained her during the death of her sister from cancer.

Guy West recounts how he first became aware of the immense size of the universe, and describes his beliefs in a God who designed and provides purpose for that universe.

Lucile Watson recounts her childhood discovery of the knowledge that she could change herself for the better, and, after successes with simple things such as maintaining her hair and quitting nail-biting, she developed a philosophy for life, including a belief that God was in everything and made everything.

Van Horn Ely, Jr., explains his belief in the goodness of people and his efforts, based on the story of Moses and the Ten Commandments, to be open and honest in all of his interactions with other people.

Mary Draper, a meber on the boards of Brooklyn Bureau of Social Service, Children's Aid Society, and Long Island University Hospital, describes her belief in equality and change as a positive force in the world and peoples lives, positive change she has seen in people through her work and she hopes for changes in the world that will bring peace and progress.

Melanie Kreuzer describes the responsibilities that come with parenthood and community service.

Thomas Boushall describes how, despite diagnoses to the contrary, he survived both mastoiditis and tuberculosis, and developed the belief that his life was a gift to be used to serve God and others.

Werner Herbert, Head of Werner Textile Consultants, would like to add an eleventh commandment; to be kind to everyone. He also explains why kindess is important and how followinf this commandment has positively affected his life.

Susan Savage talks about the impact the death of her mother had on her and her beliefs.

Howard Henderson describes how a series of failures and challenges during his early life and career revealed to him an inner strength and resiliance, and describes his belief that a person's strength comes from being part of a greater whole - family, community, world, or God.

Susan Savage talks about the impact the death of her mother had on her and her beliefs.

Louis Miller, director of the Jewish Memorial Hospital in New York City, remembers the important lesson he learned from his mother, to always help those in need, and describes how this led him to a career in hospital administration.

Signe Hasso tells the parable of a painter attempting to create his masterpiece to describe her belief in the importance of refraining from judgement since it is impossible to know and understand the complicated events that bring a person to any moment or place in their life.

Burton Fowler states that the fundamental principles of his beliefs--God, Jesus Christ, and the brotherhood of humanity--derive from his early years on an upstate New York farm.

Fannie Hurst talks about the example her husband set of how to live a selfless life, and her belief that many such lights of selfless living--though small--can together illuminate an entire arena in the world.