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Thelma Mills desribes her philosophy of social service, as well as her beliefs in the personality of Jesus Christ, God's eternal purpose for the universe, and her own role in living out that purpose by serving others.

Julius Stulman states his belief in the need for self-evaluation and describes his own practice of speculating on what values the future might require and subsequently living his life towards achieving those goals.

Ernest Melby talks about his belief in the individuality of people and the need for freedom and liberty in order for people to develop to the greatest potential.

George Haynes, executive director of the National Urban League, describes his beliefs in the equal potential of humans, in beauty, truth, goodness, peace, life, God, and eternity.

George Sokolsky talks about his experience abroad and how the experience affected his philosophy of life, politics, and religion.

The essence of Louise Miller's philosophy is that heaven is around us and at the "center of man" and explains how she cultivates this in herself through meditation and the outcomes, particualrly in relations with others, she finds.

Lee DuBridge describes his beliefs in science, both what can be understood now, and what will be explained as civilization progresses toward the future.

Thomas O Leary describes stories of human kindness, and his belief that working in newspapers is a way to bring the truth to light.

Jacob Bronowski describes his simultaneous introduction to mathematics and the English language, his love that developed for both subjects, and his belief in using the mind to find truth.

Arthur Gill describes his belief that children's dreams are his hope for the creativity, innovation, progress, and peace of the future.

Rubin Gotesky relates an experience of feeling part of yet aloof from the universe, and describes his belief that though isolation is an essential part of the self, his actions do matter and can help to change the world.

Rollo Peters explains his faith and wonder in people as individuals and the influence of friends on people's lives, recalling a his friendship with Edward Gordon Craig.

Thomas Dreier describes how his belief in a loving God too big to be contained by labels helps support his beliefs in religious tolerance and in the importance of demonstrating God's existance through a life of loving service.

Milton Katz describes how his experiences in another culture caused him to question the universal nature of his own values, but his reaction to world powers such as Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union led him to conclude that his values of freedom and justice and charity were true, after all.

John Sinclair, president of the National Industrial Conference Board, describes his belief that faith in an immortal soul, prayer, knowledge of the truth, and humility will help him overcome discouragement, cynicism, and the fear of death.

Maulsby Kimball, Jr., describes his belief that man is full of potential that has yet to be tapped, and his belief that humans can unlock that potential through art and creative activity.

John Gassner describes his abhorrence of dogma and his belief that humanism is the belief system that can enable humanity to make scientific progress without destroying itself.

Pat O'Brien describes his belief in faith and prayer and the diginity of persons.

Bennet Schauffler talks about the importance of keeping active in order to find happiness, that if one enjoys what one is doing and works at it one has no time, or inclination, to argue or fight with others. boredom and inactivity have led people to conflict and materialistic greed.

Wilis Gorthy describes how as a boy he was drawn toward careers that were flashy and important; later in life, he found satisfaction through a career in helping disabled individuals achieve productive lifes.