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Eugene Gregg, Vice President and General Manager of Westrex Corporation, describes his beliefs that persons are responsible to a higher authority and responsible for taking care of others as well as themselves.

Joseph Klacsman describes his simple faith and the happiness he derives from serving a wide variety of passengers during his work as a Pullman conductor.

Mary Belden, president and treasurer of Belden Frosting Company, describes her beliefs in the brotherhood of individuals, the need for tolerance, the importance of listening to the other side of an argument, the dignity of human beings, the need to remember the past, and her confidence that Christianity will triumph over other philosophies, dispelling fear and uncertainty.

Harold Clurman describes how difficult the theater field was during the Great Depression, but expresses his love and motivations for being in theater and his desire to serve others.

Jay Kennedy speaks of growing up as a young, homeless orphan and the important lesson of survival, and staying alive, that he learned and still lives by, although tempered by the knowledge that to fully develop one must do so within the context of reltionships with others.

Richard Tucker describes his belief in honesty and keeping one's word, and recounts how he strives to teach his son that even so-called "white lies" still hurt the teller of the lie.

Walden Pell describes his belief that life is an "educational enterprise" filled with teachers who must be sure that they are passing along the truth to the next generation.

Frank Weil describes his beliefs that one must earn future privileges through the work of today, that belief in the future provides strength for meeting the challenges of today, and that people in general have the wisdom and integrity to achieve a better tomorrow.

Stanley Kramer describes how a schoolteacher told him to have "the courage to be unpopular" and how that advice shaped his life and career in Hollywood.

George Washington impersonator and insurance agent, Lawrence Hart describes his beliefs: that the world was intelligently designed, that we have been given brains to combat sin and suffering and the desire to help make the world better, that we are responsible for who we are as much as heredity or environment, that truth will prevail over falsehood, that Christ's principals are the finest ever taught, that worship services and meditation are essential to understanding life's meaning, and that life continues after death.