Search

Search Results

Lloyd Jordan explains why he believes man is imperishable and the importance of children to peace and happiness in the future.

Edward T. Hall, Headmaster of the Hill School at Pottstown, describes how he came to believe in the efficacy of prayer.

Robert Allman explains why losing his sight endowed him with an appreciation for life and how he learned to believe in himself and adapt and adjust to reality.

Waino K. Latvala, a Finnish-American, describes his experiences as an information officer fighting for Finland during the Finnish War, and how he believes that fear is a catalyst to action.

Nora Laing describes the process of how she came to believe in the immortality of the soul and in a life's purpose that extended beyond fulfilling physical needs and desires.

Frank La Forge describes his work and achievements in his career as a musician and pianist and believes in the necessity of acting to the best of one's ability and faith in God's support of one's efforts.

Reginald Orcutt, the Vice President for Overseas of the Mergenthaler Linotype Company, explains how he developed his own belief in humanism and believes in always being open to truth and always sharing truth.

Theodore Heubener describes how he came to believe that suffering had a purpose, either as the result of a person's transgression of the natural order of the universe, or as the basis through which one's character is formed.

Martha Graham describes her belief that individuals learn through practice: just as learning to dance is achieved through difficult yet rewarding discipline, so life is learned through the process of living. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Hector Bolitho describes how he came to value solitude and leisure over the fear of being alone and the desire to be in constant competition with others. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Leonard Bernstein describes his belief in the importance and dignity of individuals, and in the future of America as a leader in science, art, and human progress. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Lou Crandall describes his belief that hard work brings value to our accomplishments, a belief he believes that his ancestors, the founding fathers, and architects and engineers from history all shared.

Eddie Cantor states his beliefs in simple things--faith, family, and friends--and describes how giving to others has brought him personal satisfaction and reward. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Ben Burman describes his beliefs in the value of kindness, the importance of striving for artistic excellence, and the utility of humor as an anecdote to pretension and tyranny. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Virginia Sale believes that to have a succesful and happy life it is important to do good for others in all things and to do this she tries to remember to act always as one of God's children.

Arthur Motley, president and publisher of Parade magazine, describes his expereince wathcing "Death of a Salesman" and his reaction ot the portrayal the negative portrayal of salesman and why he believes salesman and selling are synonymous with change, progress, action and is like life in miniature.

Holgar Johnson, President of the Institute of Life Insurance, explains the importance of adapting to change for progress, and lists some of his beliefs such as: faith in honesty of people, respect for people, the importance of compassion, taking action for one's self, and the belief in a higher power. This essay also contains an advertisement for a This I Believe LP album.

Dick Button, five-time World Champion, describes how, during a skating exhibition in Prague in 1948, he was showered with oranges wrapped in messages from the Czech people, messages which underscored his belief in the importance of political freedom. Audio also contains an Advertisement for This I Believe book, Volume II.

Robert King describes how a youthful desire for an automobile led to several crimes and a stretch in jail; however, the time to reflect and the gift of a jalopy from a friend helped him change his lifestyle, and now he believes in a Supreme Being, the oneness of humanity, and the possibility that a universal language could achieve world peace.

John Kelly tells the story of his disqualification from the Diamond Sculls rowing competition for having apprenticed as a bricklayer and the resulting hope to meet Beresford, the Diamond Sculls champion, in the Olympics to compete against him for the Gold Medal. Kelly concludes that he believes his failures are the most important memories he holds.