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John Gassner describes his abhorrence of dogma and his belief that humanism is the belief system that can enable humanity to make scientific progress without destroying itself.

Pat O'Brien describes his belief in faith and prayer and the diginity of persons.

Bennet Schauffler talks about the importance of keeping active in order to find happiness, that if one enjoys what one is doing and works at it one has no time, or inclination, to argue or fight with others. boredom and inactivity have led people to conflict and materialistic greed.

Wilis Gorthy describes how as a boy he was drawn toward careers that were flashy and important; later in life, he found satisfaction through a career in helping disabled individuals achieve productive lifes.

Eugene Gregg, Vice President and General Manager of Westrex Corporation, describes his beliefs that persons are responsible to a higher authority and responsible for taking care of others as well as themselves.

Joseph Klacsman describes his simple faith and the happiness he derives from serving a wide variety of passengers during his work as a Pullman conductor.

Mary Belden, president and treasurer of Belden Frosting Company, describes her beliefs in the brotherhood of individuals, the need for tolerance, the importance of listening to the other side of an argument, the dignity of human beings, the need to remember the past, and her confidence that Christianity will triumph over other philosophies, dispelling fear and uncertainty.

Harold Clurman describes how difficult the theater field was during the Great Depression, but expresses his love and motivations for being in theater and his desire to serve others.

Jay Kennedy speaks of growing up as a young, homeless orphan and the important lesson of survival, and staying alive, that he learned and still lives by, although tempered by the knowledge that to fully develop one must do so within the context of reltionships with others.

Richard Tucker describes his belief in honesty and keeping one's word, and recounts how he strives to teach his son that even so-called "white lies" still hurt the teller of the lie.

Walden Pell describes his belief that life is an "educational enterprise" filled with teachers who must be sure that they are passing along the truth to the next generation.

Frank Weil describes his beliefs that one must earn future privileges through the work of today, that belief in the future provides strength for meeting the challenges of today, and that people in general have the wisdom and integrity to achieve a better tomorrow.

Stanley Kramer describes how a schoolteacher told him to have "the courage to be unpopular" and how that advice shaped his life and career in Hollywood.

George Washington impersonator and insurance agent, Lawrence Hart describes his beliefs: that the world was intelligently designed, that we have been given brains to combat sin and suffering and the desire to help make the world better, that we are responsible for who we are as much as heredity or environment, that truth will prevail over falsehood, that Christ's principals are the finest ever taught, that worship services and meditation are essential to understanding life's meaning, and that life continues after death.

Sidonie Gruenberg describes her belief in the importance of both family life and productive occupation outside the home, and recounts how she balanced those values in her own life.

Edward Sherman emphasizes the need for responsibility and sacrifice for the sake of the country and to preserve its leadership in the world, and lists his personal commandments, a "Decalogue of Civic Responsibility."

Robert Colwell describes his belief that a free society starts with personal responsibility, and he quotes theologian Martin Luther's description of two kinds of faith--one can either hold beliefs that are passive or beliefs that lead to action.

Frieda Gates discusses how her work as a librarian allows her to help others educate themselves and the importance of tolerance and respect for others views.

Kenneth Johnson talks of the importance of democracy, freedom and human welfare, and emphasizes the ethical principles that underlie our democratic ideals.

Hilda Yoder describes how she used to emphasize marriage and financial security, only to lose both her husband and home; she describes how she found purpose and healing in serving others; and she states her beliefs in virtues of kindness, forgiveness, simplicity, and humilty that are still practiced by children (and should be practiced by adults).