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Guy West recounts how he first became aware of the immense size of the universe, and describes his beliefs in a God who designed and provides purpose for that universe.

Lucile Watson recounts her childhood discovery of the knowledge that she could change herself for the better, and, after successes with simple things such as maintaining her hair and quitting nail-biting, she developed a philosophy for life, including a belief that God was in everything and made everything.

Van Horn Ely, Jr., explains his belief in the goodness of people and his efforts, based on the story of Moses and the Ten Commandments, to be open and honest in all of his interactions with other people.

Mary Draper, a meber on the boards of Brooklyn Bureau of Social Service, Children's Aid Society, and Long Island University Hospital, describes her belief in equality and change as a positive force in the world and peoples lives, positive change she has seen in people through her work and she hopes for changes in the world that will bring peace and progress.

Melanie Kreuzer describes the responsibilities that come with parenthood and community service.

Thomas Boushall describes how, despite diagnoses to the contrary, he survived both mastoiditis and tuberculosis, and developed the belief that his life was a gift to be used to serve God and others.

Werner Herbert, Head of Werner Textile Consultants, would like to add an eleventh commandment; to be kind to everyone. He also explains why kindess is important and how followinf this commandment has positively affected his life.

Susan Savage talks about the impact the death of her mother had on her and her beliefs.

Howard Henderson describes how a series of failures and challenges during his early life and career revealed to him an inner strength and resiliance, and describes his belief that a person's strength comes from being part of a greater whole - family, community, world, or God.

Susan Savage talks about the impact the death of her mother had on her and her beliefs.

Louis Miller, director of the Jewish Memorial Hospital in New York City, remembers the important lesson he learned from his mother, to always help those in need, and describes how this led him to a career in hospital administration.

Signe Hasso tells the parable of a painter attempting to create his masterpiece to describe her belief in the importance of refraining from judgement since it is impossible to know and understand the complicated events that bring a person to any moment or place in their life.

Burton Fowler states that the fundamental principles of his beliefs--God, Jesus Christ, and the brotherhood of humanity--derive from his early years on an upstate New York farm.

Fannie Hurst talks about the example her husband set of how to live a selfless life, and her belief that many such lights of selfless living--though small--can together illuminate an entire arena in the world.