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Dick Button, five-time World Champion, describes how, during a skating exhibition in Prague in 1948, he was showered with oranges wrapped in messages from the Czech people, messages which underscored his belief in the importance of political freedom. Audio also contains an Advertisement for This I Believe book, Volume II.

Robert King describes how a youthful desire for an automobile led to several crimes and a stretch in jail; however, the time to reflect and the gift of a jalopy from a friend helped him change his lifestyle, and now he believes in a Supreme Being, the oneness of humanity, and the possibility that a universal language could achieve world peace.

John Kelly tells the story of his disqualification from the Diamond Sculls rowing competition for having apprenticed as a bricklayer and the resulting hope to meet Beresford, the Diamond Sculls champion, in the Olympics to compete against him for the Gold Medal. Kelly concludes that he believes his failures are the most important memories he holds.

David Richie mentions a social experiment he tried in which he behaved selfishly one week and selflessly the following, what he discovered is that he felt better when acting selflessly and he believes now that good deeds can only be accomplished through good means.

Victor Andrade, Bolivian Ambassador to the United States, describes how he explained the concept of electricity to his son, and states his beliefs that the soul, like electricity, is an unseen force; that a moral order exists; that happiness must be based on immaterial, rather than material, means; and that all individuals are equal. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Francis Bolton explains how her mother's death prompted her to search for truth, and describes her beliefs that all life is part of a Universal Life, that progress and achievement come after suffering and darkness, and that human beings have evolved out of the essence of God and will ultimately be reabsorbed into God's Being. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Sidonie Gruenberg describes her belief in the importance of both family life and productive occupation outside the home, and recounts how she balanced those beliefs in her own life. NOTE: This version has been abbreviated to include an advertisement after the essay. Contains advertisement for a book containing 100 "This I Believe" essays. Duplicate of the essay, complete and without the advertisement, is on XTV-18161 (Box 004).

Thelma Mills desribes her philosophy of social service, as well as her beliefs in the personality of Jesus Christ, God's eternal purpose for the universe, and her own role in living out that purpose by serving others.

Julius Stulman states his belief in the need for self-evaluation and describes his own practice of speculating on what values the future might require and subsequently living his life towards achieving those goals.

Ernest Melby talks about his belief in the individuality of people and the need for freedom and liberty in order for people to develop to the greatest potential.

George Haynes, executive director of the National Urban League, describes his beliefs in the equal potential of humans, in beauty, truth, goodness, peace, life, God, and eternity.

George Sokolsky talks about his experience abroad and how the experience affected his philosophy of life, politics, and religion.

The essence of Louise Miller's philosophy is that heaven is around us and at the "center of man" and explains how she cultivates this in herself through meditation and the outcomes, particualrly in relations with others, she finds.

Lee DuBridge describes his beliefs in science, both what can be understood now, and what will be explained as civilization progresses toward the future.

Thomas O Leary describes stories of human kindness, and his belief that working in newspapers is a way to bring the truth to light.

Jacob Bronowski describes his simultaneous introduction to mathematics and the English language, his love that developed for both subjects, and his belief in using the mind to find truth.

Arthur Gill describes his belief that children's dreams are his hope for the creativity, innovation, progress, and peace of the future.

Rubin Gotesky relates an experience of feeling part of yet aloof from the universe, and describes his belief that though isolation is an essential part of the self, his actions do matter and can help to change the world.

Rollo Peters explains his faith and wonder in people as individuals and the influence of friends on people's lives, recalling a his friendship with Edward Gordon Craig.

Thomas Dreier describes how his belief in a loving God too big to be contained by labels helps support his beliefs in religious tolerance and in the importance of demonstrating God's existance through a life of loving service.