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Charles Abrams tells of his faith in man despite his frequent uncertainty when confronted with the realities of war, greed and other instances of human weakness. However, he remains devoted to the ability of man to rely on his conscience to someday improve and perfect the world in which we live.

Newbold Morris describes the American spirit and howthat spirit is exemplified though progressive, democratic values and their corresponding government programs.

Genevieve B. Earle remembers the surprise of seeing poverty as a child and how she developed a belief in the benefits of a strong government to promote laws and provide for its citizens although she says that can only happen when the people are engaged as active, equal partners in the work of a city.

Roger Ansell, associate editor of Holiday Magazine, describes his belief in the need for skepticism rather than arrogant certainty, in his hope that civilization will advance through the current anxious age, in the importance of seeing society's maturation as a point yet to come in the future, in the realization of the humanity of others, and in the refreshing openness of children.

Lou Crandall uses the analogy of construction to describe his belief that young people are foundations upon which a strong, straight character must be built, and looks to Biblical characters for examples of steadfast integrity.

Lee Bristol describes his belief in the individual, the individual's role in achieving peace and acquiring happiness through humor, service to others, and faith.

Charles Duveen, Jr. describes his experience of being shot from a plane while flying over the Pacific durinig WWII, and how his perspective on life changed from one which placed value in material objects to one which found value in service to others.

Dimitri Mitropolous describes two experiences, that led him to his belief that talent and celebrity should be used to help others.

J. George Frederick uses the analogy of the heart's cardiovascular system to describe his beliefs in the need to love, to forgive, and to sacrifice for others.

W. David Curtiss describes how his well-laid life plans were interrupted by WWII, and how the uncertainty of war taught him to accept change, not with resignation, but with a spirit of adventure.

Bentz Plagemann describes his experience in the Navy during WWII and the resulting belief that with patience and faith there are no difficulties one cannot overcome in life.

Howard Spalding describes his belief in a divine spark that exists within every person and which spurs creative invention and moral reasoning, and states his belief that happiness is achieved through the ability to use creative intelligence in the service of others.

Senator Lehman describes his two basic beliefs: First, one should give back to society according to what he or she has received, and secondly, one should extend respect to the opinions and beliefs of others.

Alexander Bloch describes his parents' desire for him to start a career in business rather than in music, and his ultimate decision to pursue what he loved.

Ward Greene charts a timeline of faith through an individual's lifetime--accepting as a child, intense as a young adult, and uncertain in middle age--and describes his beliefs in simple truths such as the Golden Rule.

Joe Williams describes how sports and an escape from a plane crash have shaped his beliefs that sports reveal and develop character, and that there comes a point when events in life can no longer be changed, but rather pass "into the record" and must be accepted with calmness.

Mr. and Mrs. Hale, having been married for a long time, talk of the imminent death that will separate them as they age, and inspite of the expected grief they will continue to see life with excitement and wonder, and remind all of the importance to have compassion for everyone.

Verona Slater describes her experience with religion as a child, the daughter of a minister, and how her beliefs in wisdom, kindess, courage and strneght have been shaped by these experiences.

Richard Salmon ponders the magnitude of the universe and describes his realization that everything is part of God's plan and how fishing teaches him to make the best of life.

Douglas Fairbanks describes his fathers resistance to his acting career, and difficulties starting his political carreer and how he overcame obstacles through his determination.

Fulton Oursler explains why faith and love are the two most important prinicples in his life and how to practice them.

Enseng Ho lecture entitled Burial and Travel: Islam across Indian Ocean Cultures.

Paul Barnes relates a series of experiences in which he was helped by people of differing religious faith, socioeconomic status, political affiliations or skin color, and how these experiences affirm his belief in the essential goodness of people.

Elmer Bobst, President of Warner-Hudnut Incorporated, describes his 82-year-old friend Bernard Baruch, and describes his belief that long life and happiness are achieved through the act of remaining productive, even after retirement.

Carl Carmer remembers the education his father gave him as a child by introducing him to different people and how he developed an appreciation for the "wisdom of the people."

Hans Simons remembers his experiences in Nazi, Germany and the necessity of leaving Europe and tells how he assimilated and appreciates the diversity and freedoms of his new country.

Robert Hillyer describes his belief that a poet's job is to strip away dead or negative emotions to allow room for light, and his belief in finding satisfaction from each day as it arrives. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Barry Bingham explains the effect that war had on his upbringing and how contemplation while in the Pacific Islands led him to the awareness that he must work to the best of his ability to earn and deserve God's friendship, as must all people.

Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and poet Paul Mowrer describes the importance of faith and hope to his beliefes, which include first hand experiences of both the good and bad that people can do.

Lucy Freeman talks about her trouble and how psychoanalysis and faith helped her to feel good about herself again.

Quentin Reynolds explains why he would first burn the Bible if he were a dictator: the Bible is the source of democracy and its stories tell of the power of individuality and non-conformity which make a dictatorship impossible, according to Reynolds.

Margery Brown describes her beliefs in God, in the existence of a soul, in the satisfaction of contributing to life, and in the value of humility.

Caroline Duer describes most of her beliefs through a poem she wrote which emphasizes the value of enjoying simple pleasures, showing kindness and courtesy, working, avoiding excessive caution, meeting obligations, being courageous, showing tolerance, and avoiding regrets, for "the day is dark; it may be fair tomorrow." This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Lily Pons describes how she learned to deal with stage fright, and how an inner voice helped her persevere to become an opera singer.

John Hughes talks about living honestly as a taxicab driver in New York City.

Daryl Zanuck explains that the virtues he learned in his boyhood in Nebraska, charity and loyalty, are still the fundamental virtues that are most important in his life.

Arthur Hays speaks about his belief in freedom and the importance of democratic values and ideals to maintaining liberty.

Lost Theaters of Somerville: Nick Riselli Interview

Interview conducted by Kenneth Cleary and Kristina Ceruzzi.

Interview conducted on 2/13/05 by Sam Stiegler at Oscar Greene's home in West Medford.

Interview was conducted on 3/12/05 by Nakeiha Primus at the home of Louise Jordan. In addition a telephone interview took place on 3/22/05.

Lloyd Jordan explains why he believes man is imperishable and the importance of children to peace and happiness in the future.

Edward T. Hall, Headmaster of the Hill School at Pottstown, describes how he came to believe in the efficacy of prayer.

Robert Allman explains why losing his sight endowed him with an appreciation for life and how he learned to believe in himself and adapt and adjust to reality.

Waino K. Latvala, a Finnish-American, describes his experiences as an information officer fighting for Finland during the Finnish War, and how he believes that fear is a catalyst to action.

Nora Laing describes the process of how she came to believe in the immortality of the soul and in a life's purpose that extended beyond fulfilling physical needs and desires.

Frank La Forge describes his work and achievements in his career as a musician and pianist and believes in the necessity of acting to the best of one's ability and faith in God's support of one's efforts.

Reginald Orcutt, the Vice President for Overseas of the Mergenthaler Linotype Company, explains how he developed his own belief in humanism and believes in always being open to truth and always sharing truth.

Theodore Heubener describes how he came to believe that suffering had a purpose, either as the result of a person's transgression of the natural order of the universe, or as the basis through which one's character is formed.

Martha Graham describes her belief that individuals learn through practice: just as learning to dance is achieved through difficult yet rewarding discipline, so life is learned through the process of living. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Hector Bolitho describes how he came to value solitude and leisure over the fear of being alone and the desire to be in constant competition with others. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Leonard Bernstein describes his belief in the importance and dignity of individuals, and in the future of America as a leader in science, art, and human progress. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Lou Crandall describes his belief that hard work brings value to our accomplishments, a belief he believes that his ancestors, the founding fathers, and architects and engineers from history all shared.

Eddie Cantor states his beliefs in simple things--faith, family, and friends--and describes how giving to others has brought him personal satisfaction and reward. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Ben Burman describes his beliefs in the value of kindness, the importance of striving for artistic excellence, and the utility of humor as an anecdote to pretension and tyranny. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Virginia Sale believes that to have a succesful and happy life it is important to do good for others in all things and to do this she tries to remember to act always as one of God's children.

Arthur Motley, president and publisher of Parade magazine, describes his expereince wathcing "Death of a Salesman" and his reaction ot the portrayal the negative portrayal of salesman and why he believes salesman and selling are synonymous with change, progress, action and is like life in miniature.

Holgar Johnson, President of the Institute of Life Insurance, explains the importance of adapting to change for progress, and lists some of his beliefs such as: faith in honesty of people, respect for people, the importance of compassion, taking action for one's self, and the belief in a higher power. This essay also contains an advertisement for a This I Believe LP album.

Dick Button, five-time World Champion, describes how, during a skating exhibition in Prague in 1948, he was showered with oranges wrapped in messages from the Czech people, messages which underscored his belief in the importance of political freedom. Audio also contains an Advertisement for This I Believe book, Volume II.

Robert King describes how a youthful desire for an automobile led to several crimes and a stretch in jail; however, the time to reflect and the gift of a jalopy from a friend helped him change his lifestyle, and now he believes in a Supreme Being, the oneness of humanity, and the possibility that a universal language could achieve world peace.

John Kelly tells the story of his disqualification from the Diamond Sculls rowing competition for having apprenticed as a bricklayer and the resulting hope to meet Beresford, the Diamond Sculls champion, in the Olympics to compete against him for the Gold Medal. Kelly concludes that he believes his failures are the most important memories he holds.

David Richie mentions a social experiment he tried in which he behaved selfishly one week and selflessly the following, what he discovered is that he felt better when acting selflessly and he believes now that good deeds can only be accomplished through good means.

Victor Andrade, Bolivian Ambassador to the United States, describes how he explained the concept of electricity to his son, and states his beliefs that the soul, like electricity, is an unseen force; that a moral order exists; that happiness must be based on immaterial, rather than material, means; and that all individuals are equal. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Francis Bolton explains how her mother's death prompted her to search for truth, and describes her beliefs that all life is part of a Universal Life, that progress and achievement come after suffering and darkness, and that human beings have evolved out of the essence of God and will ultimately be reabsorbed into God's Being. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Sidonie Gruenberg describes her belief in the importance of both family life and productive occupation outside the home, and recounts how she balanced those beliefs in her own life. NOTE: This version has been abbreviated to include an advertisement after the essay. Contains advertisement for a book containing 100 "This I Believe" essays. Duplicate of the essay, complete and without the advertisement, is on XTV-18161 (Box 004).

Thelma Mills desribes her philosophy of social service, as well as her beliefs in the personality of Jesus Christ, God's eternal purpose for the universe, and her own role in living out that purpose by serving others.

Julius Stulman states his belief in the need for self-evaluation and describes his own practice of speculating on what values the future might require and subsequently living his life towards achieving those goals.

Ernest Melby talks about his belief in the individuality of people and the need for freedom and liberty in order for people to develop to the greatest potential.

George Haynes, executive director of the National Urban League, describes his beliefs in the equal potential of humans, in beauty, truth, goodness, peace, life, God, and eternity.

George Sokolsky talks about his experience abroad and how the experience affected his philosophy of life, politics, and religion.

The essence of Louise Miller's philosophy is that heaven is around us and at the "center of man" and explains how she cultivates this in herself through meditation and the outcomes, particualrly in relations with others, she finds.

Lee DuBridge describes his beliefs in science, both what can be understood now, and what will be explained as civilization progresses toward the future.

Thomas O Leary describes stories of human kindness, and his belief that working in newspapers is a way to bring the truth to light.

Jacob Bronowski describes his simultaneous introduction to mathematics and the English language, his love that developed for both subjects, and his belief in using the mind to find truth.

Arthur Gill describes his belief that children's dreams are his hope for the creativity, innovation, progress, and peace of the future.

Rubin Gotesky relates an experience of feeling part of yet aloof from the universe, and describes his belief that though isolation is an essential part of the self, his actions do matter and can help to change the world.

Rollo Peters explains his faith and wonder in people as individuals and the influence of friends on people's lives, recalling a his friendship with Edward Gordon Craig.

Thomas Dreier describes how his belief in a loving God too big to be contained by labels helps support his beliefs in religious tolerance and in the importance of demonstrating God's existance through a life of loving service.

Milton Katz describes how his experiences in another culture caused him to question the universal nature of his own values, but his reaction to world powers such as Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union led him to conclude that his values of freedom and justice and charity were true, after all.

John Sinclair, president of the National Industrial Conference Board, describes his belief that faith in an immortal soul, prayer, knowledge of the truth, and humility will help him overcome discouragement, cynicism, and the fear of death.

Maulsby Kimball, Jr., describes his belief that man is full of potential that has yet to be tapped, and his belief that humans can unlock that potential through art and creative activity.

John Gassner describes his abhorrence of dogma and his belief that humanism is the belief system that can enable humanity to make scientific progress without destroying itself.

Pat O'Brien describes his belief in faith and prayer and the diginity of persons.

Bennet Schauffler talks about the importance of keeping active in order to find happiness, that if one enjoys what one is doing and works at it one has no time, or inclination, to argue or fight with others. boredom and inactivity have led people to conflict and materialistic greed.

Wilis Gorthy describes how as a boy he was drawn toward careers that were flashy and important; later in life, he found satisfaction through a career in helping disabled individuals achieve productive lifes.

Eugene Gregg, Vice President and General Manager of Westrex Corporation, describes his beliefs that persons are responsible to a higher authority and responsible for taking care of others as well as themselves.

Joseph Klacsman describes his simple faith and the happiness he derives from serving a wide variety of passengers during his work as a Pullman conductor.

Mary Belden, president and treasurer of Belden Frosting Company, describes her beliefs in the brotherhood of individuals, the need for tolerance, the importance of listening to the other side of an argument, the dignity of human beings, the need to remember the past, and her confidence that Christianity will triumph over other philosophies, dispelling fear and uncertainty.

Harold Clurman describes how difficult the theater field was during the Great Depression, but expresses his love and motivations for being in theater and his desire to serve others.

Jay Kennedy speaks of growing up as a young, homeless orphan and the important lesson of survival, and staying alive, that he learned and still lives by, although tempered by the knowledge that to fully develop one must do so within the context of reltionships with others.

Richard Tucker describes his belief in honesty and keeping one's word, and recounts how he strives to teach his son that even so-called "white lies" still hurt the teller of the lie.

Walden Pell describes his belief that life is an "educational enterprise" filled with teachers who must be sure that they are passing along the truth to the next generation.

Frank Weil describes his beliefs that one must earn future privileges through the work of today, that belief in the future provides strength for meeting the challenges of today, and that people in general have the wisdom and integrity to achieve a better tomorrow.

Stanley Kramer describes how a schoolteacher told him to have "the courage to be unpopular" and how that advice shaped his life and career in Hollywood.

George Washington impersonator and insurance agent, Lawrence Hart describes his beliefs: that the world was intelligently designed, that we have been given brains to combat sin and suffering and the desire to help make the world better, that we are responsible for who we are as much as heredity or environment, that truth will prevail over falsehood, that Christ's principals are the finest ever taught, that worship services and meditation are essential to understanding life's meaning, and that life continues after death.

Sidonie Gruenberg describes her belief in the importance of both family life and productive occupation outside the home, and recounts how she balanced those values in her own life.

Edward Sherman emphasizes the need for responsibility and sacrifice for the sake of the country and to preserve its leadership in the world, and lists his personal commandments, a "Decalogue of Civic Responsibility."

Robert Colwell describes his belief that a free society starts with personal responsibility, and he quotes theologian Martin Luther's description of two kinds of faith--one can either hold beliefs that are passive or beliefs that lead to action.