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Charles Abrams tells of his faith in man despite his frequent uncertainty when confronted with the realities of war, greed and other instances of human weakness. However, he remains devoted to the ability of man to rely on his conscience to someday improve and perfect the world in which we live.

Newbold Morris describes the American spirit and howthat spirit is exemplified though progressive, democratic values and their corresponding government programs.

Genevieve B. Earle remembers the surprise of seeing poverty as a child and how she developed a belief in the benefits of a strong government to promote laws and provide for its citizens although she says that can only happen when the people are engaged as active, equal partners in the work of a city.

Roger Ansell, associate editor of Holiday Magazine, describes his belief in the need for skepticism rather than arrogant certainty, in his hope that civilization will advance through the current anxious age, in the importance of seeing society's maturation as a point yet to come in the future, in the realization of the humanity of others, and in the refreshing openness of children.

Lou Crandall uses the analogy of construction to describe his belief that young people are foundations upon which a strong, straight character must be built, and looks to Biblical characters for examples of steadfast integrity.

Lee Bristol describes his belief in the individual, the individual's role in achieving peace and acquiring happiness through humor, service to others, and faith.

Charles Duveen, Jr. describes his experience of being shot from a plane while flying over the Pacific durinig WWII, and how his perspective on life changed from one which placed value in material objects to one which found value in service to others.

Dimitri Mitropolous describes two experiences, that led him to his belief that talent and celebrity should be used to help others.

J. George Frederick uses the analogy of the heart's cardiovascular system to describe his beliefs in the need to love, to forgive, and to sacrifice for others.

W. David Curtiss describes how his well-laid life plans were interrupted by WWII, and how the uncertainty of war taught him to accept change, not with resignation, but with a spirit of adventure.

Bentz Plagemann describes his experience in the Navy during WWII and the resulting belief that with patience and faith there are no difficulties one cannot overcome in life.

Howard Spalding describes his belief in a divine spark that exists within every person and which spurs creative invention and moral reasoning, and states his belief that happiness is achieved through the ability to use creative intelligence in the service of others.

Senator Lehman describes his two basic beliefs: First, one should give back to society according to what he or she has received, and secondly, one should extend respect to the opinions and beliefs of others.

Alexander Bloch describes his parents' desire for him to start a career in business rather than in music, and his ultimate decision to pursue what he loved.

Ward Greene charts a timeline of faith through an individual's lifetime--accepting as a child, intense as a young adult, and uncertain in middle age--and describes his beliefs in simple truths such as the Golden Rule.

Joe Williams describes how sports and an escape from a plane crash have shaped his beliefs that sports reveal and develop character, and that there comes a point when events in life can no longer be changed, but rather pass "into the record" and must be accepted with calmness.

Mr. and Mrs. Hale, having been married for a long time, talk of the imminent death that will separate them as they age, and inspite of the expected grief they will continue to see life with excitement and wonder, and remind all of the importance to have compassion for everyone.

Verona Slater describes her experience with religion as a child, the daughter of a minister, and how her beliefs in wisdom, kindess, courage and strneght have been shaped by these experiences.

Richard Salmon ponders the magnitude of the universe and describes his realization that everything is part of God's plan and how fishing teaches him to make the best of life.

Douglas Fairbanks describes his fathers resistance to his acting career, and difficulties starting his political carreer and how he overcame obstacles through his determination.

Fulton Oursler explains why faith and love are the two most important prinicples in his life and how to practice them.

Enseng Ho lecture entitled Burial and Travel: Islam across Indian Ocean Cultures.

Paul Barnes relates a series of experiences in which he was helped by people of differing religious faith, socioeconomic status, political affiliations or skin color, and how these experiences affirm his belief in the essential goodness of people.

Elmer Bobst, President of Warner-Hudnut Incorporated, describes his 82-year-old friend Bernard Baruch, and describes his belief that long life and happiness are achieved through the act of remaining productive, even after retirement.

Carl Carmer remembers the education his father gave him as a child by introducing him to different people and how he developed an appreciation for the "wisdom of the people."

Hans Simons remembers his experiences in Nazi, Germany and the necessity of leaving Europe and tells how he assimilated and appreciates the diversity and freedoms of his new country.

Robert Hillyer describes his belief that a poet's job is to strip away dead or negative emotions to allow room for light, and his belief in finding satisfaction from each day as it arrives. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Barry Bingham explains the effect that war had on his upbringing and how contemplation while in the Pacific Islands led him to the awareness that he must work to the best of his ability to earn and deserve God's friendship, as must all people.

Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and poet Paul Mowrer describes the importance of faith and hope to his beliefes, which include first hand experiences of both the good and bad that people can do.

Lucy Freeman talks about her trouble and how psychoanalysis and faith helped her to feel good about herself again.

Quentin Reynolds explains why he would first burn the Bible if he were a dictator: the Bible is the source of democracy and its stories tell of the power of individuality and non-conformity which make a dictatorship impossible, according to Reynolds.

Margery Brown describes her beliefs in God, in the existence of a soul, in the satisfaction of contributing to life, and in the value of humility.

Caroline Duer describes most of her beliefs through a poem she wrote which emphasizes the value of enjoying simple pleasures, showing kindness and courtesy, working, avoiding excessive caution, meeting obligations, being courageous, showing tolerance, and avoiding regrets, for "the day is dark; it may be fair tomorrow." This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Lily Pons describes how she learned to deal with stage fright, and how an inner voice helped her persevere to become an opera singer.

John Hughes talks about living honestly as a taxicab driver in New York City.

Daryl Zanuck explains that the virtues he learned in his boyhood in Nebraska, charity and loyalty, are still the fundamental virtues that are most important in his life.

Arthur Hays speaks about his belief in freedom and the importance of democratic values and ideals to maintaining liberty.

Lost Theaters of Somerville: Nick Riselli Interview

Interview conducted by Kenneth Cleary and Kristina Ceruzzi.

Interview conducted on 2/13/05 by Sam Stiegler at Oscar Greene's home in West Medford.

Interview was conducted on 3/12/05 by Nakeiha Primus at the home of Louise Jordan. In addition a telephone interview took place on 3/22/05.

Lloyd Jordan explains why he believes man is imperishable and the importance of children to peace and happiness in the future.

Edward T. Hall, Headmaster of the Hill School at Pottstown, describes how he came to believe in the efficacy of prayer.

Robert Allman explains why losing his sight endowed him with an appreciation for life and how he learned to believe in himself and adapt and adjust to reality.

Waino K. Latvala, a Finnish-American, describes his experiences as an information officer fighting for Finland during the Finnish War, and how he believes that fear is a catalyst to action.

Nora Laing describes the process of how she came to believe in the immortality of the soul and in a life's purpose that extended beyond fulfilling physical needs and desires.

Frank La Forge describes his work and achievements in his career as a musician and pianist and believes in the necessity of acting to the best of one's ability and faith in God's support of one's efforts.

Reginald Orcutt, the Vice President for Overseas of the Mergenthaler Linotype Company, explains how he developed his own belief in humanism and believes in always being open to truth and always sharing truth.