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Newbold Morris describes the American spirit and howthat spirit is exemplified though progressive, democratic values and their corresponding government programs.

Ruth Cranston describes how a period of questioning and her world travels helped her to develop a set of beliefs which she found common to all religions: the unity of life; the interdependence of humanity; and the need to love and serve others, protect the weak, and live a non-violent life.

Edmond Rieder describes how his experiences with hotel guests have established his belief in the basic goodness of people, and he believes that praticing the Golden Rule and trying his best at his endeavors has led to satisfaction.

E. E. Wieman explains the importance of sharing in life and how sharing is exemplified in sports; however, Wieman also describes how learned to share from his mother, which is the basis of his optimism.

Tinfu Tsiang describes his belief that China and the West each have valuable cultural insight to offer the other, and that the way to world peace is to focus on ulitizing existing resources more efficiently and to preserve human freedom in one's home country.

You Chan Yang describes his hope that he has made a difference in the lives of injured or disabled persons during his tenure on earth, and relates a story in which a boy discovers that only God knows the definition of goodness.

William Carlson, president of the State University of New York, describes how his experience of living with an Inuit family in Greenland disproved his belief of belonging to a superior race, and states his beliefs in the brotherhood of humanity, the virtue of patience, the need of self-evaluation, the unity of family, and the method of science. Contains a short advertisement for This I Believe book (this essay included in the book).

Aldous Huxley describes his belief that the ideal society towards which he must strive is one that reduces the number of temptations for its citizens. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Robert Travers, Assoc. Professor, Department of History, Cornell University. Lecture entitled "The Connected World of Haji Mustapha: an informer to the British in eighteenth century Bengal"