Search

Search Results

Susan Savage talks about the impact the death of her mother had on her and her beliefs.

Susan Savage talks about the impact the death of her mother had on her and her beliefs.

Galen Jones, an official in the Office of Education of the Federal Security Agency, describes his belief in the digity of human personality, in the existence of free will, and in the responsibility of individuals to make their own choices in life.

William Hubben describes how, despite his experiences in Nazi Germany and the popular lack of faith in social progress, he still maintains a belief in the meaning of life and faith in the moral values of the next generation.

Instructor of world literature and effective writing at the University of Baltimore, Ray Montgomery describes his belief that there is God in all men and that people must strive to find this inner God to create a better world in which people can live peacefully together in equality and cooperation.

Anne Donaldson describes her beliefs in the loving Fatherhood of God, the brotherhood of humanity, the triumph of good over evil, and the development of God's Kingdom through the efforts of individuals working with God's help for social reform.

Cal Farley describes the beliefs that led him to found Boys Ranch: that a boy given a good home with proper meals and clothes will turn into a productive citizen rather than ending up in jail or reform school.

Tinfu Tsiang describes his belief that China and the West each have valuable cultural insight to offer the other, and that the way to world peace is to focus on ulitizing existing resources more efficiently and to preserve human freedom in one's home country.

You Chan Yang describes his hope that he has made a difference in the lives of injured or disabled persons during his tenure on earth, and relates a story in which a boy discovers that only God knows the definition of goodness.

Betty Jacob describes her belief in the brotherhood of humanity, her disillusionment, and the final reaffirmation of her belief sparked by her work with international citizens via the United Nations.

Bob Evans explains his belief in the individual and the individual's responsibility to oneself, to one's community, and to one's God, emphasizing the importance of equality, self respect and the Ten Commandments.

Kate Holliday describes her beliefs in the brotherhood of humanity, in the right to freedom of worship, and in the Golden rule.

Harry Schacter, president of the Kaufman-Straus Company, describes his belief in fighting for social justice: though one individual might not make a difference, he still has a right to choose the side upon which he fights.

Robert Stacy-Judd relates an experience from early in his career when unemployment left him homeless and in despair; however, rather than taking his own life, he had the opportunity to prevent another from committing suicide, establishing his faith in divine help, prayer, and a sense of humor.

William Carlson, president of the State University of New York, describes how his experience of living with an Inuit family in Greenland disproved his belief of belonging to a superior race, and states his beliefs in the brotherhood of humanity, the virtue of patience, the need of self-evaluation, the unity of family, and the method of science. Contains a short advertisement for This I Believe book (this essay included in the book).

Aldous Huxley describes his belief that the ideal society towards which he must strive is one that reduces the number of temptations for its citizens. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

James B. Carey describes his belief in liberty for all humanity, based on his belief that all Americans are "displaced persons" (immigrants) and have the right to pursue the resources necessary to fulfill their basic physical and spiritual needs.

William Thompson describes life in his hometown, Croton-on-Hudson, and how simplicity keeps life manageable and productive.

Charles Johnson describes how his great-grandfather's experience with slavery, his father's experience as a Baptist minister, and his own college experience in social services have helped to shape his belief that "no man can be justly judged until youve looked at the world through his eyes".

Nicholas Norton describes his belief that beauty is the basic tenant which makes his life feel secure, that religion ought to lead to a feeling of beauty, and that he would be willing to fight and die to prevent oppression and preserve freedom.