Search

Search Results

Newbold Morris describes the American spirit and howthat spirit is exemplified though progressive, democratic values and their corresponding government programs.

Genevieve B. Earle remembers the surprise of seeing poverty as a child and how she developed a belief in the benefits of a strong government to promote laws and provide for its citizens although she says that can only happen when the people are engaged as active, equal partners in the work of a city.

Senator Lehman describes his two basic beliefs: First, one should give back to society according to what he or she has received, and secondly, one should extend respect to the opinions and beliefs of others.

Paul Barnes relates a series of experiences in which he was helped by people of differing religious faith, socioeconomic status, political affiliations or skin color, and how these experiences affirm his belief in the essential goodness of people.

John Hughes talks about living honestly as a taxicab driver in New York City.

Arthur Hays speaks about his belief in freedom and the importance of democratic values and ideals to maintaining liberty.

Virginia Sale believes that to have a succesful and happy life it is important to do good for others in all things and to do this she tries to remember to act always as one of God's children.

Frank Weil describes his beliefs that one must earn future privileges through the work of today, that belief in the future provides strength for meeting the challenges of today, and that people in general have the wisdom and integrity to achieve a better tomorrow.

Edwin Lukas speaks about the importance of tolerance and respect for other people, cultures and races and the negative impact prejudice can have on an individual and a community.

Stanley Isaacs talks about his dedication and enthusiasm for politics and civic engagement and expresses how his faith in judaism supports his beliefs in democratic values like liberty and individuality.