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Edward Mann describes the simple truths that he believes are the root of his happines; faith in God, service to others, and friendships.

Lucius D. Clay describes being inspired by the German people's desire for democracy following World War II and believes that all people want peace and liberty and also believes freedom is a privilege given by God, and one that must be carefully guarded by all citizens and he calls upon Americans to make this country one that provides equal opportunities for all.

Edmond Rieder describes how his experiences with hotel guests have established his belief in the basic goodness of people, and he believes that praticing the Golden Rule and trying his best at his endeavors has led to satisfaction.

Virginia Sale believes that to have a succesful and happy life it is important to do good for others in all things and to do this she tries to remember to act always as one of God's children.

While reporting from Germany during Nazi rule, radio commentator William L. Shirer learned the value of tolerance and freedom and was inspired by people's ability to retain their faith and will to live in the face of attrocities. Shirer believes that mans resilience, especially during times of war, comes from having a rich inner life of reflection and contemplation.

Wade Hampton lists his beliefs, some of which are: humility, faith, and respect for others, and the moral order of the universe.

Nobel Prize winning President of the Royal Academy, Henry Dale describes his belief in the "supreme value of truth" and the need for science to join forces with religion to help explain both material reality and our immaterial feelings of free will and a moral purpose in life.

Frederick Thayer considers the many different philosophies and belief systems in the world and arrives at the conclusion that people would be better off focusing on their present life and conduct rather than on their afterlife.