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Newbold Morris describes the American spirit and howthat spirit is exemplified though progressive, democratic values and their corresponding government programs.

Genevieve B. Earle remembers the surprise of seeing poverty as a child and how she developed a belief in the benefits of a strong government to promote laws and provide for its citizens although she says that can only happen when the people are engaged as active, equal partners in the work of a city.

Gilbert Murray describes the religious importance of poetry in his life and how his experiences in WWI guided his efforts to prevent future war.

J. Arthur Rank expressees his faith in God and humanity and the power of faith to transform the world in to a peaceful society.

Harold Evans recalls his relationship with Count Bernadotte who was assasinated while a Mediator on a U.N. peace keeping effort, and compares him with President Abraham Lincoln as two men with conviction, faith and integrity and examples of the type of individuals people can look up to to create prosperity and peace in the world for everyone.

Ahmad Zaki Abu Shadi describes his belief in freedom and justice, first developed through books, and then strengthened through his own life experiences that caused him to leave Egypt and ultimately move to the United States.

Professor of Surgery at the University of Minnesota and Surgeon at the Mayo Clinic of Rochester, Dr. Mayo tells of his belief in a purpose to everything in life; the need for compassion and respect for other people; how science supports his faith and belief in the immaterial; our responsibility to help others; and the value of humor in life.

Meredith Willson remembers his friend Max Terr to explain why one does not need to be famous in order to leave their mark on the world.

Ruth Cranston describes how a period of questioning and her world travels helped her to develop a set of beliefs which she found common to all religions: the unity of life; the interdependence of humanity; and the need to love and serve others, protect the weak, and live a non-violent life.

Senator Lehman describes his two basic beliefs: First, one should give back to society according to what he or she has received, and secondly, one should extend respect to the opinions and beliefs of others.

Red Barber talks about the spirit of the athlete and how this exemplifies the importance of spirit in life.

Paul Barnes relates a series of experiences in which he was helped by people of differing religious faith, socioeconomic status, political affiliations or skin color, and how these experiences affirm his belief in the essential goodness of people.

Bobby Doerr, second baseman for the Boston Red Sox, describes his belief that it is better to help his teammates through simple actions than to make a flashy play that only causes problems for the team.

Ralph Richmond talks about his illness and the recovery that gave him a new, fresh perspective on his life.

James Du Pont explains his belief that life is difficult but people are strong, although complicated by being both good and bad, and to be good one must be humble, compassionate and have faith.

John Hughes talks about living honestly as a taxicab driver in New York City.

Katherine Bottigheimer remembers an encounter with her elderly cousin Theresa and the consequent philosophy she unconsciously developed as a result: the value of hard work for the betterment of others.

Arthur Hays speaks about his belief in freedom and the importance of democratic values and ideals to maintaining liberty.

Edward Mann describes the simple truths that he believes are the root of his happines; faith in God, service to others, and friendships.

Lucius D. Clay describes being inspired by the German people's desire for democracy following World War II and believes that all people want peace and liberty and also believes freedom is a privilege given by God, and one that must be carefully guarded by all citizens and he calls upon Americans to make this country one that provides equal opportunities for all.

Edmond Rieder describes how his experiences with hotel guests have established his belief in the basic goodness of people, and he believes that praticing the Golden Rule and trying his best at his endeavors has led to satisfaction.

Virginia Sale believes that to have a succesful and happy life it is important to do good for others in all things and to do this she tries to remember to act always as one of God's children.

While reporting from Germany during Nazi rule, radio commentator William L. Shirer learned the value of tolerance and freedom and was inspired by people's ability to retain their faith and will to live in the face of attrocities. Shirer believes that mans resilience, especially during times of war, comes from having a rich inner life of reflection and contemplation.

Wade Hampton lists his beliefs, some of which are: humility, faith, and respect for others, and the moral order of the universe.

Nobel Prize winning President of the Royal Academy, Henry Dale describes his belief in the "supreme value of truth" and the need for science to join forces with religion to help explain both material reality and our immaterial feelings of free will and a moral purpose in life.

Frederick Thayer considers the many different philosophies and belief systems in the world and arrives at the conclusion that people would be better off focusing on their present life and conduct rather than on their afterlife.

Catherine Walsh describes her belief that it is impossible to be truly happy and the importance of always making the best effort in what one does.

Frank Weil describes his beliefs that one must earn future privileges through the work of today, that belief in the future provides strength for meeting the challenges of today, and that people in general have the wisdom and integrity to achieve a better tomorrow.

William Joyce, founder of Joyce Incorporated, Shoe Manufacturers, describes how the deaths of his brother and son led him to conclude that he could only have faith in God's purposes rather than demand an explanation of His actions.

Richard Potter discusses his closes with nature as a child and his belief that there is much to be gained from living close to nature and more children must be raised with an awareness of nature.

Doris Almy explains how her trust in the omnipotence of God and the reestablishment of her faith allowed her to overcome her fears and anxiety, and discusses her belief in kindness and education as a relief from anxiety in the lives of others.

Edward Sherman emphasizes the need for responsibility and sacrifice for the sake of the country and to preserve its leadership in the world, and lists his personal commandments, a "Decalogue of Civic Responsibility."

Mrs. Palmer describes the environment in which she grew up and the values and faith she acquired as a result, and why this faith might help others navigate through a confusing and "unpredictable era."

Edwin Lukas speaks about the importance of tolerance and respect for other people, cultures and races and the negative impact prejudice can have on an individual and a community.

E. E. Wieman explains the importance of sharing in life and how sharing is exemplified in sports; however, Wieman also describes how learned to share from his mother, which is the basis of his optimism.

Lord Kemsley describes his beliefs in the importance of family life, home-made entertainment, and self-reliance.

Stanley Isaacs talks about his dedication and enthusiasm for politics and civic engagement and expresses how his faith in judaism supports his beliefs in democratic values like liberty and individuality.

Laura Crandon of the Horace Mann School for the Deaf states her belief that the world's problems could be addressed if individuals viewed humanity as an interconnected society in which each individual has a part to play.

Guy West recounts how he first became aware of the immense size of the universe, and describes his beliefs in a God who designed and provides purpose for that universe.

Melanie Kreuzer describes the responsibilities that come with parenthood and community service.

Susan Savage talks about the impact the death of her mother had on her and her beliefs.

Susan Savage talks about the impact the death of her mother had on her and her beliefs.

Galen Jones, an official in the Office of Education of the Federal Security Agency, describes his belief in the digity of human personality, in the existence of free will, and in the responsibility of individuals to make their own choices in life.

William Hubben describes how, despite his experiences in Nazi Germany and the popular lack of faith in social progress, he still maintains a belief in the meaning of life and faith in the moral values of the next generation.

Instructor of world literature and effective writing at the University of Baltimore, Ray Montgomery describes his belief that there is God in all men and that people must strive to find this inner God to create a better world in which people can live peacefully together in equality and cooperation.

Anne Donaldson describes her beliefs in the loving Fatherhood of God, the brotherhood of humanity, the triumph of good over evil, and the development of God's Kingdom through the efforts of individuals working with God's help for social reform.