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Lillian Ferrence describes a moment of spiritual revelation in the sculpture court at the Brooklyn Museum, and her beliefs in God's tie to beauty, the importance of considering the feelings of others, the use of humor to dispel anxiety, and the brotherhood of humanity.

S. Richard Silverman describes his belief in the significance of all people, even a deaf child, and the potential of anyone to accomplish change in the world.

Mary Belden, president and treasurer of Belden Frosting Company, describes her beliefs in the brotherhood of individuals, the need for tolerance, the importance of listening to the other side of an argument, the dignity of human beings, the need to remember the past, and her confidence that Christianity will triumph over other philosophies, dispelling fear and uncertainty.

Kenneth Johnson talks of the importance of democracy, freedom and human welfare, and emphasizes the ethical principles that underlie our democratic ideals.

Harry Blake describes a conversation with his sons in which they discuss the need for faith, hope, and charity to attain a succesful and happy life.

Harry Dietrich describes how his family background, his teachers, and the tools and techniques invented by doctors of previous generations have all equipped him to achieve healing more effectively than ever before, and his belief that his responsibility is to help dispel fear in his patients.

Lawrence Schoonover describes his experiment with ethics in his youth and his questioning of the relevance of the Ten Commandments. He then recounts the awareness of his mistake and how he lives by them and raises his children according to them.

Poetry editor of The American Friend, E. Merrill Root describes an experience of crossing the Atlantic under threat of submarine attack, and realizing, in the midst of fear, that life contains incredible beauty.

E. E. Wieman explains the importance of sharing in life and how sharing is exemplified in sports; however, Wieman also describes how learned to share from his mother, which is the basis of his optimism.

Alfred Nilson describes how, as a harvester in California, the only way to keep his balance while traveling on foot along the railroad ties was to focus his eyes on the distance, and he explains how this lesson in farsightedness has helped him to balance the rest of his life.