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Harry Dietrich describes how his family background, his teachers, and the tools and techniques invented by doctors of previous generations have all equipped him to achieve healing more effectively than ever before, and his belief that his responsibility is to help dispel fear in his patients.

Lawrence Schoonover describes his experiment with ethics in his youth and his questioning of the relevance of the Ten Commandments. He then recounts the awareness of his mistake and how he lives by them and raises his children according to them.

Poetry editor of The American Friend, E. Merrill Root describes an experience of crossing the Atlantic under threat of submarine attack, and realizing, in the midst of fear, that life contains incredible beauty.

E. E. Wieman explains the importance of sharing in life and how sharing is exemplified in sports; however, Wieman also describes how learned to share from his mother, which is the basis of his optimism.

Alfred Nilson describes how, as a harvester in California, the only way to keep his balance while traveling on foot along the railroad ties was to focus his eyes on the distance, and he explains how this lesson in farsightedness has helped him to balance the rest of his life.

Gillie Potter states his belief in the power of wit and "foolishness" to communicate truth, and describes his belief that his task is to bring merriness back to a modern zeitgeist that is currently devoid of humor.

Jean Hersholt describes his belief that human relationships are "problems of arithmetic"--where there are few people, individuals realize their responsibility to help their neighbors, but in crowded areas, the responsibility is passed along to someone else--and he notes that the world would be a better place if people remembered that they were in fact neighbors.

John Cornelius describes the two sayings that have stayed with him, "All things are great and small by comparison" and "service is the rent we pay for the space we occupy," and concludes by emphasizing the importance of supporting and educating youth to fight Communism.

Roger Williams describes his belief that the modern age needs to balance its achievements in science and technology with wisdom and the foresight to anticipate the impact that innovations will have upon daily living.

Mary Draper, a meber on the boards of Brooklyn Bureau of Social Service, Children's Aid Society, and Long Island University Hospital, describes her belief in equality and change as a positive force in the world and peoples lives, positive change she has seen in people through her work and she hopes for changes in the world that will bring peace and progress.