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Newbold Morris describes the American spirit and howthat spirit is exemplified though progressive, democratic values and their corresponding government programs.

Roger Ansell, associate editor of Holiday Magazine, describes his belief in the need for skepticism rather than arrogant certainty, in his hope that civilization will advance through the current anxious age, in the importance of seeing society's maturation as a point yet to come in the future, in the realization of the humanity of others, and in the refreshing openness of children.

Upton Sinclair describes the military (Navy) and religious (Episcopalian) background of his family, and his own choice to defend his country and bring change through his writing.

Harold Stassen describes Albert Schweitzer's life and his philosophy of "reverance for life," and from this explains why people yearn for freedom and dictatorships can never stop this yearning.

Ruth Cranston describes how a period of questioning and her world travels helped her to develop a set of beliefs which she found common to all religions: the unity of life; the interdependence of humanity; and the need to love and serve others, protect the weak, and live a non-violent life.

Aniket De, Muhammad Mustafa Monowar, Sara Mehnaz, Ishrat Jahan Prioti, From Medina to Malacca: The Spread of Sufism

Elizabeth Deutsch describes her youthful search for beliefs, which has brought her into contact with many churches and thinkers, and her conclusion that she would live her life the same way whether a Diety exists or not.

Philosophy 167: Class 1 - Part 1 Introduction: The Discovery of High-Quality Evidence

Fulton Oursler explains why faith and love are the two most important prinicples in his life and how to practice them.

Sponsored by the Office of the Provost, an interdisciplinary seminar on child and youth development helps students explore international perspectives on children in exceptionally difficult circumstances.

Enseng Ho lecture entitled Burial and Travel: Islam across Indian Ocean Cultures.

Harry McAlpin describes his belief in the importance of justice and equality, and the challenges of living that creed as an African American in America.

Barry Bingham explains the effect that war had on his upbringing and how contemplation while in the Pacific Islands led him to the awareness that he must work to the best of his ability to earn and deserve God's friendship, as must all people.

Lily Pons describes how she learned to deal with stage fright, and how an inner voice helped her persevere to become an opera singer.

Lost Theaters of Somerville: Generosa Aiello Interview

Lost Theaters of Somerville: Bob Hanon Interview

Paul Sabine describes how his early beliefs were fractured into those about physical realities and those about spiritual realities, but now he believes modern physics has given him the framework to harmonize his beliefs into a coherant whole.

Howard Petersen describes how children confidently believe that good will triumph over evil, and outlines his belief that we must work to make this youthful optimism a reality by learning to live in harmony with others.

Denis Brogan explains that he doesn't share the certainty or types of belief that many adherents of world religions claim, but he does believe that love is better than hate, and that the love of friends gives meaning to life.

Edmond Rieder describes how his experiences with hotel guests have established his belief in the basic goodness of people, and he believes that praticing the Golden Rule and trying his best at his endeavors has led to satisfaction.

Martha Graham describes her belief that individuals learn through practice: just as learning to dance is achieved through difficult yet rewarding discipline, so life is learned through the process of living. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Arthur Motley, president and publisher of Parade magazine, describes his expereince wathcing "Death of a Salesman" and his reaction ot the portrayal the negative portrayal of salesman and why he believes salesman and selling are synonymous with change, progress, action and is like life in miniature.

Dag Hammarskjold, Secretary General of the United Nations, describes his beliefs in the value of self-sacrifice and service to country and humanity, in the equality of individuals, in the importance of intellectual honesty, and in the rewards of selfless love and duty. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Stan Kenton is concerned with the development of humanity and he describes the need for growth and change for positive development to progress in all aspects of a person's life and also explains that everyone participates and contributes something to the development of humanity and his contributions and own developments are through music. This essay also contains an advertisement for a This I Believe LP album.

Lillian Ferrence describes a moment of spiritual revelation in the sculpture court at the Brooklyn Museum, and her beliefs in God's tie to beauty, the importance of considering the feelings of others, the use of humor to dispel anxiety, and the brotherhood of humanity.

S. Richard Silverman describes his belief in the significance of all people, even a deaf child, and the potential of anyone to accomplish change in the world.

Mary Belden, president and treasurer of Belden Frosting Company, describes her beliefs in the brotherhood of individuals, the need for tolerance, the importance of listening to the other side of an argument, the dignity of human beings, the need to remember the past, and her confidence that Christianity will triumph over other philosophies, dispelling fear and uncertainty.

Kenneth Johnson talks of the importance of democracy, freedom and human welfare, and emphasizes the ethical principles that underlie our democratic ideals.

Harry Blake describes a conversation with his sons in which they discuss the need for faith, hope, and charity to attain a succesful and happy life.

Harry Dietrich describes how his family background, his teachers, and the tools and techniques invented by doctors of previous generations have all equipped him to achieve healing more effectively than ever before, and his belief that his responsibility is to help dispel fear in his patients.

Lawrence Schoonover describes his experiment with ethics in his youth and his questioning of the relevance of the Ten Commandments. He then recounts the awareness of his mistake and how he lives by them and raises his children according to them.

Poetry editor of The American Friend, E. Merrill Root describes an experience of crossing the Atlantic under threat of submarine attack, and realizing, in the midst of fear, that life contains incredible beauty.

E. E. Wieman explains the importance of sharing in life and how sharing is exemplified in sports; however, Wieman also describes how learned to share from his mother, which is the basis of his optimism.

Alfred Nilson describes how, as a harvester in California, the only way to keep his balance while traveling on foot along the railroad ties was to focus his eyes on the distance, and he explains how this lesson in farsightedness has helped him to balance the rest of his life.

Gillie Potter states his belief in the power of wit and "foolishness" to communicate truth, and describes his belief that his task is to bring merriness back to a modern zeitgeist that is currently devoid of humor.

Jean Hersholt describes his belief that human relationships are "problems of arithmetic"--where there are few people, individuals realize their responsibility to help their neighbors, but in crowded areas, the responsibility is passed along to someone else--and he notes that the world would be a better place if people remembered that they were in fact neighbors.

John Cornelius describes the two sayings that have stayed with him, "All things are great and small by comparison" and "service is the rent we pay for the space we occupy," and concludes by emphasizing the importance of supporting and educating youth to fight Communism.

Roger Williams describes his belief that the modern age needs to balance its achievements in science and technology with wisdom and the foresight to anticipate the impact that innovations will have upon daily living.

Mary Draper, a meber on the boards of Brooklyn Bureau of Social Service, Children's Aid Society, and Long Island University Hospital, describes her belief in equality and change as a positive force in the world and peoples lives, positive change she has seen in people through her work and she hopes for changes in the world that will bring peace and progress.

Ned Dearborn, president of the National Safety Council and former dean of the Division of General Education at New York University, talks about the importance of faith in overcoming adversity and describes the many things in which he places faith, such as religion, the goodness of people, himself, and he concludes by describing his faith in faith itself.

Paul Williams describes his belief that what makes humans different from animals is their ability to communicate, exchange ideas, form opinions, and reach judgements--characteristics which support the progress of civilization.

Lord Vansittart describes his belief that there is no compromise possible between good and evil, and that an individual must make a stand against evil.

Sir Philip Joubert, Director of Public Relations in the Air Ministry, describes his beliefs in the goodness of humans, in the importance of self-sacrifice and duty, and in the uncertainty of believing in the simple faith of the past.

Christmas Humphreys recounts his search for beliefs that he could live by, and states his beliefs in the Four Noble Truths of Buddhism.

Tinfu Tsiang describes his belief that China and the West each have valuable cultural insight to offer the other, and that the way to world peace is to focus on ulitizing existing resources more efficiently and to preserve human freedom in one's home country.

You Chan Yang describes his hope that he has made a difference in the lives of injured or disabled persons during his tenure on earth, and relates a story in which a boy discovers that only God knows the definition of goodness.

Milo Bekins describes his belief that society must invest in education so that the youth of today can bring the progress of tomorrow.

Hudson Hoagland describes the importance of science and democracy and how they work together.

William Carlson, president of the State University of New York, describes how his experience of living with an Inuit family in Greenland disproved his belief of belonging to a superior race, and states his beliefs in the brotherhood of humanity, the virtue of patience, the need of self-evaluation, the unity of family, and the method of science. Contains a short advertisement for This I Believe book (this essay included in the book).

Archibald Davison, Professor of Music at Harvard University and Director of the Harvard Glee Club, recounts a childhood experience in which he shut the door on a man who had come to the house in search of work, and describes his belief in the importance of weighing his actions and words carefully and avoiding the unnecessary infliction of pain. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Aldous Huxley describes his belief that the ideal society towards which he must strive is one that reduces the number of temptations for its citizens. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

William Dalrymple lecture entitled "Return of a King: Shah Shuja and the First Anglo-Afghan War 1839-42"

Chester Maxey describes the "creative force" that is vital to a meaningful society and how the United States' success is a result of its nourishing this creative spirit.

Edith Hamilton talks about "spiritual truth" and why faith, not facts, are necessary for understanding it.

John Nason talks about the importance of education in creating a just and thoughtful society and adds that he believes these qualities of justice and goodness are an inherent part of the universe.

Sunil Amrith lecture entitled "Islam in the Bay of Bengal: Between Tamil and Malay Worlds"

Robert Travers, Assoc. Professor, Department of History, Cornell University. Lecture entitled "The Connected World of Haji Mustapha: an informer to the British in eighteenth century Bengal"

Partha Chatterjee lecture entitled "Early Modern Absolutism in 18th Century India"

Interview conducted 2/25/05 at the Baptist Church, W. Springfield by Gwynne Langley and Toryn Miller-Stevens. Present were Lois Pinton, Toryn Miller-Stevens and Gwynne Langley.

Interviewed in Shantiniketan, West Bengal by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

Seema Alavi lecture entitled "Mughal Decline and the emergence of new global connections in early modern India"

Interviewed in Dhaka, Bangladesh by Iftekhar Iqbal

Interviewed in Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

Sunaina Basu, Nusmila Lohani, Shehryar Nabi, Colonial Globalism in the Bay of Bengal: A Class Based Perspective

Interviewed in Oxford, United Kingdom by Kris Manjapra

Dr. Tim Harper, Centre for History and Economics, Magdalene College, Cambridge University. Lecture entitled "Singapore 1915 and the Birth of the Asian Underground"

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Hillsborough, New Jersey, United States of America by Kris Manjapra

Robert Kaplan, author of Monsoon: The Indian Ocean and the Future of American Power (Random House 2010), in discussion with Sugata Bose (Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University).

Interviewed in Delhi, India by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

Walter Wilcox describes his belief that the world has steadily gotten better during his lifetime, and his belief that individuals must create order out of the personal chaos in which they find themselves, with truth and freedom as necessary components of this task.

Nile Green lecture entitled "An Economy of Enchantment: Markets for Islam in an Industrializing Ocean."

Eric Tagliacozzo lecture entitled Hajj in the Time of Cholera: Pilgrim Ships and Contagion from Southeast Asia to the Red Sea

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Oxford, United Kingdom by Kris Manjapra

86. Sunil Das