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Dimitri Mitropolous describes two experiences, that led him to his belief that talent and celebrity should be used to help others.

W. David Curtiss describes how his well-laid life plans were interrupted by WWII, and how the uncertainty of war taught him to accept change, not with resignation, but with a spirit of adventure.

Howard Spalding describes his belief in a divine spark that exists within every person and which spurs creative invention and moral reasoning, and states his belief that happiness is achieved through the ability to use creative intelligence in the service of others.

Senator Lehman describes his two basic beliefs: First, one should give back to society according to what he or she has received, and secondly, one should extend respect to the opinions and beliefs of others.

Theodore Heubener describes how he came to believe that suffering had a purpose, either as the result of a person's transgression of the natural order of the universe, or as the basis through which one's character is formed.

Arthur Motley, president and publisher of Parade magazine, describes his expereince wathcing "Death of a Salesman" and his reaction ot the portrayal the negative portrayal of salesman and why he believes salesman and selling are synonymous with change, progress, action and is like life in miniature.

Victor Andrade, Bolivian Ambassador to the United States, describes how he explained the concept of electricity to his son, and states his beliefs that the soul, like electricity, is an unseen force; that a moral order exists; that happiness must be based on immaterial, rather than material, means; and that all individuals are equal. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Thelma Mills desribes her philosophy of social service, as well as her beliefs in the personality of Jesus Christ, God's eternal purpose for the universe, and her own role in living out that purpose by serving others.

George Sokolsky talks about his experience abroad and how the experience affected his philosophy of life, politics, and religion.

Milton Katz describes how his experiences in another culture caused him to question the universal nature of his own values, but his reaction to world powers such as Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union led him to conclude that his values of freedom and justice and charity were true, after all.