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Ahmad Zaki Abu Shadi describes his belief in freedom and justice, first developed through books, and then strengthened through his own life experiences that caused him to leave Egypt and ultimately move to the United States.

Dimitri Mitropolous describes two experiences, that led him to his belief that talent and celebrity should be used to help others.

W. David Curtiss describes how his well-laid life plans were interrupted by WWII, and how the uncertainty of war taught him to accept change, not with resignation, but with a spirit of adventure.

Howard Spalding describes his belief in a divine spark that exists within every person and which spurs creative invention and moral reasoning, and states his belief that happiness is achieved through the ability to use creative intelligence in the service of others.

Senator Lehman describes his two basic beliefs: First, one should give back to society according to what he or she has received, and secondly, one should extend respect to the opinions and beliefs of others.

Elizabeth Deutsch describes her youthful search for beliefs, which has brought her into contact with many churches and thinkers, and her conclusion that she would live her life the same way whether a Diety exists or not.

Robert MacIver describes his belief that no matter how thoroughly he pursues knowledge of the world, he realizes that there will always be aspects yet to be explained, leaving room for wonder in his view of the world. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Bill Sears talks about his belief in the importance of developing faith and a moral character to live life to its fullest potential and greatest happiness.

Curt Massey talks about the importance of attending church in his life and the life of his family and how prayer and meditation allow him to better cope with stress in his life.

Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and poet Paul Mowrer describes the importance of faith and hope to his beliefes, which include first hand experiences of both the good and bad that people can do.

Norman Cousins elaborates on the play of free will and determinism in the development of people and society and the detrimental affects fear can have on this development.

Interview was conducted on 3/2/05 by Nakeiha Primus at the home of Louise Jordan.

Claude Fuess, Headmaster of Phillips Academy, describes himself as a "long-range optimist" who believes that the majority of today's boys are full of character and thoughtfulness, despite the newspaper headlines that suggest the moral decline of youth.

Theodore Heubener describes how he came to believe that suffering had a purpose, either as the result of a person's transgression of the natural order of the universe, or as the basis through which one's character is formed.

Charles Bennett explains the importance of loyalty in Congress and in combat and also believes that individuals must repent for one's sins and develop strong faith to make the world a peaceful place.

Starr Daily describes how he reversed his life from one of criminal activity based upon ill will towards society to one of responsibility based upon good will. Audio also contains an advertisement for This I Believe book, Volume II.

Hector Bolitho describes how he came to value solitude and leisure over the fear of being alone and the desire to be in constant competition with others. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Arthur Motley, president and publisher of Parade magazine, describes his expereince wathcing "Death of a Salesman" and his reaction ot the portrayal the negative portrayal of salesman and why he believes salesman and selling are synonymous with change, progress, action and is like life in miniature.

Charles G. Darwin, Professor of Natural Philosophy at Edinburgh University, describes his belief that human nature (as it stands) will lead to a decline in social conditions, unless society focuses on the science of heredity. Audio also contains an advertisement for "This I Believe" book, Volume II.

Victor Andrade, Bolivian Ambassador to the United States, describes how he explained the concept of electricity to his son, and states his beliefs that the soul, like electricity, is an unseen force; that a moral order exists; that happiness must be based on immaterial, rather than material, means; and that all individuals are equal. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Agnes Moorehead describes her beliefs in the efficacy of prayer, the joy of self-improvement, the necessity of truth, the challenges of an acting career, and the responsibility of an individual to live an honest life. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Chester Bowles, Ambassador to India and Nepal and former Governor of Connecticut, describes his belief that an adequate response to the threat of the nuclear age will require cooperation from all sectors of humanity, and that the issue of world poverty must be addressed. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Florence Allen, Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, explains her worry over the "deterioration of the human spirit" and her belief that faith and intelligence and the fair application of law may restore the human spirit and through law create a peacful planet. Audio includes an advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Adlai Stevenson, Governor of Illinois, describes his beliefs in generosity, in liberty, in the rights of man, in God's goodness and protection, in liberalism, in individualism, in freedom of conscience, in diversity and the right to dissent, and in open-mindedness. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Raymond Allen, Chancellor of UCLA, describes the impact his family had on teaching him responsibility and other beliefs such as the necessity of family and describes the beliefs he holds close, such as the importance of kindness,the perfectabiloity of man, the need for faith and freedom to worship, and the value of creativity. This essay also contains an advertisement for a This I Believe LP album.

Norman Cousins describes his beliefs in both the individuality of the self and the unity of all humanity, as well as in a moral order derived from universal order; therefore, the poverty of others impacts his own condition, and he works to alleviate social problems.

Alexis Kyrou, Director General of the Greek Ministry of Foreign Affairs, explains the confluence of belief and knowledge and the importance of his Greek heritage to his beliefes and enumerates what some of these are; cooperation, the importance of a spiritual life, patriotism, and repectt for others.

Thelma Mills desribes her philosophy of social service, as well as her beliefs in the personality of Jesus Christ, God's eternal purpose for the universe, and her own role in living out that purpose by serving others.

George Sokolsky talks about his experience abroad and how the experience affected his philosophy of life, politics, and religion.

Lee DuBridge describes his beliefs in science, both what can be understood now, and what will be explained as civilization progresses toward the future.

Milton Katz describes how his experiences in another culture caused him to question the universal nature of his own values, but his reaction to world powers such as Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union led him to conclude that his values of freedom and justice and charity were true, after all.

Wade Hampton lists his beliefs, some of which are: humility, faith, and respect for others, and the moral order of the universe.

Nobel Prize winning President of the Royal Academy, Henry Dale describes his belief in the "supreme value of truth" and the need for science to join forces with religion to help explain both material reality and our immaterial feelings of free will and a moral purpose in life.

Heloise Broeg describes her belief in the importance of human relationships, love, work, and knowledge.

Harold Clurman describes how difficult the theater field was during the Great Depression, but expresses his love and motivations for being in theater and his desire to serve others.

Rosalie Spidell describes her "creed of umimportant people"--her beliefs in unseen realities and the afterlife, her conviction that virture isn't dead, her certainty in a religion she has practiced since childhood, and her description of simple pleasures and joys that have enriched her everyday life.

George Higginbotham, president of the Consolidation Coal Company, describes his "principle of kindness" (a resolve to avoid hurting others), his "principle of self-analysis" (a process of self-reflection which determines personal faults and ways in which to overcome them), and his "principle of tolerance" (a belief that because God is compassionate and forgiving, he should be as well).

Edward Sherman emphasizes the need for responsibility and sacrifice for the sake of the country and to preserve its leadership in the world, and lists his personal commandments, a "Decalogue of Civic Responsibility."

Ronald Kurtz, Electronic Technician in the United States Navy, describes many of his beliefs; his optimism for the future, the value of courage, the beauty of nature and God, reasons for his sentimnetal nature, and his connection to family.

Madge Whitney describes how children's social work brings purpose to her life.

Mrs. Palmer describes the environment in which she grew up and the values and faith she acquired as a result, and why this faith might help others navigate through a confusing and "unpredictable era."

Edward Toland describes how his experiences with a French mobile field hospital in WWI changed his perspective and led him to become a teacher after the war, and he describes his belief that loving humanity by practicing the Golden Rule is the best way in which to love God.

Alfred Nilson describes how, as a harvester in California, the only way to keep his balance while traveling on foot along the railroad ties was to focus his eyes on the distance, and he explains how this lesson in farsightedness has helped him to balance the rest of his life.

Antonio Iglesias describes how his three ideals--the search for truth, a love for beauty, and a reverence for goodness--have offered him strength, certainty and motivation to pursue life despite depression, physical handicaps, suffering, loneliness, and moral indifference.

Laura Crandon of the Horace Mann School for the Deaf states her belief that the world's problems could be addressed if individuals viewed humanity as an interconnected society in which each individual has a part to play.

Gerald Heard describes his perspectives on moral laws and the freedoms we must obtain to achieve true contentment in our life, free of fears and anxiety.

Asa Call describes his beliefs in moral and spiritual laws that, like the physical laws of nature, must be discovered and followed in order to succeed in life.