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Paul Douglas, U.S. Senator (Illinois) and Professor of Industrial Relations at the University of Chicago, describes his belief that he must work towards achieving a "fellowship of friends," spreading love and good-will in his community and the world, but that armed restistance to groups such as the Nazis and Communists is justified. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Arthur Deakin, General Secretary of the Transport and General Workers' Union, states his beliefs both in an individual's responsibility to serve others and in the individual's right to freedom of conscience and expression. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Phyllis Parker is reminded of a saying she was fond of as a child, "love conquers all" and describes the good and sometimes bad results that have come of love. She also compares love to electricity, a flow of energy, and says that if we could all harness love and direct it wisely the world could be a much better place without prejudice. In addition, this essay contains an advertisement for a This I Believe LP album.

Monroe Deustch expresses his belief that the sentiment of brotherhood between people could solve many of the world's problems and also expresses his belief that there is a greater power in the world that has created the Universe and that this power is immortal just as the spirit of people is immortal as well.

Joe McNeil describes his beliefs in a God who created and watches over the universe, and in the power of preparing youth to impact their communities in tangible ways, no matter how seemingly small or insignificant.

Milton Katz describes how his experiences in another culture caused him to question the universal nature of his own values, but his reaction to world powers such as Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union led him to conclude that his values of freedom and justice and charity were true, after all.

Wallace Stegner describes his suspicions of "passionate faith" because of the religious intolerance it creates, and recounts his beliefs in virtues such as kindness and courage, and his belief that although consciences are developed differently, based on one's birthplace, nevertheless, people across the world share many values.

Edward Sherman emphasizes the need for responsibility and sacrifice for the sake of the country and to preserve its leadership in the world, and lists his personal commandments, a "Decalogue of Civic Responsibility."

Arthur Dodineau, superintendent of Detroit Public Schools, talks about the foundational experiences he had as a boy growing up on a farm in rural Michigan, and his faith in teachers, religion and the future of the United States.

Edwin Lukas speaks about the importance of tolerance and respect for other people, cultures and races and the negative impact prejudice can have on an individual and a community.