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Jack Lutz describes his belief in the three dimensions of life: height, or success; breadth, or education and culture; and depth, or faith.

George Vierheller describes his beliefs in the importance of individual achievement, self-improvement, service to others, family, and friendship.

Asa Call describes his beliefs in moral and spiritual laws that, like the physical laws of nature, must be discovered and followed in order to succeed in life.

Sir Gerald Barry, Director General of the Festival of Britain, talks about the changes in the world after World War II, his relationship to christianity and his belief that there is no life after death and so one must appreciate and live one's own life to the fullest extent.

Emery Tobin, Editor and Founder of the Alaska Sportsman, describes his belief that people have been placed in a beautiful creation in order to work to improve themselves and to serve others.

Norman Angell describes his belief that evil will triumph over good in society unless indviduals recognize their own personal capacity for evil and strive to overcome this tendency through self-discipline.

Elon Borton envies his fathers unwavering faith in God and explains his own evolving faith in God; that He has a plan and a purpose for everyone.

Art Linkletter talks about his experiences in the entertainment industry as a host and announcer and how his focus on his own abilities, limits and performance, as well as his appreication of people, has contributed to his success.

Tinfu Tsiang describes his belief that China and the West each have valuable cultural insight to offer the other, and that the way to world peace is to focus on ulitizing existing resources more efficiently and to preserve human freedom in one's home country.

Milo Bekins describes his belief that society must invest in education so that the youth of today can bring the progress of tomorrow.

Bob Evans explains his belief in the individual and the individual's responsibility to oneself, to one's community, and to one's God, emphasizing the importance of equality, self respect and the Ten Commandments.

Ohio state senator Catherine Dobbs describes her beliefs that the Golden Rule teaches her how to live life, that nature's laws underlie the basic circumstances of life, that individuals are created in the image of God, that human nature is capable of great kindness and great cruelty, and that personal freedom is a right which comes from God.

Harry Schacter, president of the Kaufman-Straus Company, describes his belief in fighting for social justice: though one individual might not make a difference, he still has a right to choose the side upon which he fights.

Robert Heinlein talks about his beliefs in his neighbors--in their kindness and willingness to look out for each other, despite differences in opinions or creeeds. NOTE: This version has been abbreviated to include an advertisement after the essay. Contains advertisement for a book containing 100 "This I Believe" essays. Duplicate of the essay, complete and without the advertisement, is on XTV-18161 (Box 004).

Asa Call describes his beliefs in moral and spiritual laws that, like the physical laws of nature, must be discovered and adhered to for a successful life. NOTE: This version has been abbreviated to include an advertisement after the essay. Contains advertisement for a book containing 100 "This I Believe" essays. Duplicate of the essay, complete and without the advertisement, is on XTV-18161 (Box 004).

Walter White, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, recounts the challenges of growing up in a family of light-skinned African Americans (never fully accepted by either side), and describes his beliefs that an end must be obtained by just means, that love for humanity will overcome any obstacles, and that persons should not be judged by their skin color or creed. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Former President of the United States, Harry Truman, states that his moral code is based upon the Ten Commandments and the Sermon on the Mount, and describes his beliefs in the duty of a public official to work for the public welfare; in the value of the civil rights movement; and in the importance of preserving civil liberties, democracy, and freedom. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book, Volume II.

Margaret Chase Smith, U.S. Senator (Maine), describes the beliefs which make the discouragment of political work worthwhile: a belief in an individual's God-given purpose and rights, such as the right to consideration and courtesy from others, the right to criticize constructively, the right honestly to hold unpopular beliefs, the right to protest orderly, and the right of independent thought. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Dore Schary lists some of the beliefs he has acquired over the course of his life; the importance of family, equality of people, respect for law, democracy, patriotism, and concludes by describing the importance of wisdom to the past, present and future of the human race.

James B. Carey describes his belief in liberty for all humanity, based on his belief that all Americans are "displaced persons" (immigrants) and have the right to pursue the resources necessary to fulfill their basic physical and spiritual needs.

Interview was conducted on by Kristina Ceruzzi at Cortland Dugger's home. Present were Cortland Dugger and Kristina Ceruzzi.

Karl Nottingham explains our duty to adjust to society and some ways to do so such as; observing the Golden Rule, treating others with kindness, and helping those less fortunate, earning trust through friendship.

Henry MacCracken describes the basic tenants of his personal philosophy--art, science, democracy, and religion--and how these four "points of the compass" are held together by freedom.

James Baxter describes his belief that the source of a country's freedom is its religion.

Chester Maxey describes the "creative force" that is vital to a meaningful society and how the United States' success is a result of its nourishing this creative spirit.

Robert McEwen describes his faith in people that he developed from working with young people in education and his belief in the adaptability of people in a dynamic universe.