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Wallace Stegner describes his suspicions of "passionate faith" because of the religious intolerance it creates, and recounts his beliefs in virtues such as kindness and courage, and his belief that although consciences are developed differently, based on one's birthplace, nevertheless, people across the world share many values.

Richard Tucker describes his belief in honesty and keeping one's word, and recounts how he strives to teach his son that even so-called "white lies" still hurt the teller of the lie.

Margaret Runbeck describes her trip to India to combat illiteracy, and her belief that there is a spiritual revival underway, as people realize that rational intelligence alone cannot prevent "global suicide."

Freya Stark talks about her belief in immortality and the afterlife and how this view of eternity affects her perspective and gives her and affinity for sincerity and truth.

Richard Potter discusses his closes with nature as a child and his belief that there is much to be gained from living close to nature and more children must be raised with an awareness of nature.

Edward Sherman emphasizes the need for responsibility and sacrifice for the sake of the country and to preserve its leadership in the world, and lists his personal commandments, a "Decalogue of Civic Responsibility."

Moekarto Notowidigdo, Foreign Minister of the Republic of Indonesia, describes being in jail during the Indonesian push for independence, and witnessing the comraderie of prisoners from all socioeconomic statuses, which led them to sing the Indonesian National Anthem during an execution.

Kenneth Johnson talks of the importance of democracy, freedom and human welfare, and emphasizes the ethical principles that underlie our democratic ideals.

Ronald Kurtz, Electronic Technician in the United States Navy, describes many of his beliefs; his optimism for the future, the value of courage, the beauty of nature and God, reasons for his sentimnetal nature, and his connection to family.

Arthur Dodineau, superintendent of Detroit Public Schools, talks about the foundational experiences he had as a boy growing up on a farm in rural Michigan, and his faith in teachers, religion and the future of the United States.

Robert Cleland, head of the Research Group of the Huntington Library, describes a time in his life in which he was distraught and took a trip along the Colorado river with friends. The beauty he saw during the trip, Robert Cleland says, reinspired his life and faith.

Edwin Lukas speaks about the importance of tolerance and respect for other people, cultures and races and the negative impact prejudice can have on an individual and a community.

Gillie Potter states his belief in the power of wit and "foolishness" to communicate truth, and describes his belief that his task is to bring merriness back to a modern zeitgeist that is currently devoid of humor.

Sidney Wallach describes his belief in the golden mean, reasonableness, democracy, and the protection of the minority, especially the individual.

Jack Lutz describes his belief in the three dimensions of life: height, or success; breadth, or education and culture; and depth, or faith.

George Vierheller describes his beliefs in the importance of individual achievement, self-improvement, service to others, family, and friendship.

Asa Call describes his beliefs in moral and spiritual laws that, like the physical laws of nature, must be discovered and followed in order to succeed in life.

Sir Gerald Barry, Director General of the Festival of Britain, talks about the changes in the world after World War II, his relationship to christianity and his belief that there is no life after death and so one must appreciate and live one's own life to the fullest extent.

Emery Tobin, Editor and Founder of the Alaska Sportsman, describes his belief that people have been placed in a beautiful creation in order to work to improve themselves and to serve others.

Norman Angell describes his belief that evil will triumph over good in society unless indviduals recognize their own personal capacity for evil and strive to overcome this tendency through self-discipline.