Search

Search Results

General Hershey laments society's fascination with technological progress and opines that society would be better off if people focused on understanding themselves, others around them and their relationships with one another.

Lewis Hoskins recalls a time when he was taken prisoner by a chinese soldier while providing humanitarian aid and his ability to find a common humanity and brotherliness with his captor that disarmed the fear and violence of the situation.

Genevieve B. Earle remembers the surprise of seeing poverty as a child and how she developed a belief in the benefits of a strong government to promote laws and provide for its citizens although she says that can only happen when the people are engaged as active, equal partners in the work of a city.

Robert Heinlein talks about his beliefs in his neighbors--in their kindness and willingness to look out for each other, despite differences in opinions or creeds.

Alfred Landon describes his belief in the ability of people to achieve monumental progress for society, and in the need to maintain a grasp of spiritual and moral truths in the midst of that progress.

Osceola Dawson describes her beliefs in the fatherhood of God, the brotherhood and equality of humanity, the Bible as the "infallible guide to conduct," and the home as "the foundation of society."

Dr. Saul's beliefs are shaped by his experiences in science and he describes his conviction that the fight-or-flight reaction and suffering in childhood can lead to developmental problems as adults; modern society must focus its energy on developing emotionally mature adults for future harmony.

Lou Crandall uses the analogy of construction to describe his belief that young people are foundations upon which a strong, straight character must be built, and looks to Biblical characters for examples of steadfast integrity.

Wilson Compton describes the influence of his Presbyterian parents on his beliefs (including his mother's child-rearing philosophy of "The Bible, soap, and spinach"), and he explains how the Golden Rule is a concept found in all of the major world religions.

Joseph Harsch describes his beliefs in the value of always moving forward (rather than stagnating) and in the importance of helping others.

Paul Helms describes his work with the Ford Foundation, as well as the impact his Christian upbringing has had on his beliefs, including his belief that giving 10% of his income results in tangible blessings.

Howard Spalding describes his belief in a divine spark that exists within every person and which spurs creative invention and moral reasoning, and states his belief that happiness is achieved through the ability to use creative intelligence in the service of others.

Senator Lehman describes his two basic beliefs: First, one should give back to society according to what he or she has received, and secondly, one should extend respect to the opinions and beliefs of others.

Albert Guerard describes his beliefs as a blend of old and new ideals that espouse liberty, progress, tolerance, and charity.

Richard Salmon ponders the magnitude of the universe and describes his realization that everything is part of God's plan and how fishing teaches him to make the best of life.

Enseng Ho lecture entitled Burial and Travel: Islam across Indian Ocean Cultures.

Justice Douglas explains his father's last words and why faith, like his father's, is necessary to ensure freedom and guide people and nations through difficult times.

Justice Douglas explains his father's last words and why faith, like his father's, is necessary to ensure freedom and guide people and nations through difficult times.

Norman Cousins elaborates on the play of free will and determinism in the development of people and society and the detrimental affects fear can have on this development.

Arthur Hays speaks about his belief in freedom and the importance of democratic values and ideals to maintaining liberty.

Lost Theaters of Somerville: Bob Hanon Interview

Nora Laing describes the process of how she came to believe in the immortality of the soul and in a life's purpose that extended beyond fulfilling physical needs and desires.

Howard Petersen describes how children confidently believe that good will triumph over evil, and outlines his belief that we must work to make this youthful optimism a reality by learning to live in harmony with others.

Charles Percy explains why believes he has never met a person he did not respect, because he is open to listening and seeing who they truly are beneath the surface.

David Richie mentions a social experiment he tried in which he behaved selfishly one week and selflessly the following, what he discovered is that he felt better when acting selflessly and he believes now that good deeds can only be accomplished through good means.

Donald Day describes his beliefs in democracy, in receiving and giving creative fulfillment in marriage, in the importance of ensuring that personal success promotes the success of society, and in replacing impersonal material giving with the personal gift of service. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Victor Andrade, Bolivian Ambassador to the United States, describes how he explained the concept of electricity to his son, and states his beliefs that the soul, like electricity, is an unseen force; that a moral order exists; that happiness must be based on immaterial, rather than material, means; and that all individuals are equal. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Paul Douglas, U.S. Senator (Illinois) and Professor of Industrial Relations at the University of Chicago, describes his belief that he must work towards achieving a "fellowship of friends," spreading love and good-will in his community and the world, but that armed restistance to groups such as the Nazis and Communists is justified. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Arthur Deakin, General Secretary of the Transport and General Workers' Union, states his beliefs both in an individual's responsibility to serve others and in the individual's right to freedom of conscience and expression. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Charles Turner, 37th Superintendent of the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, compares life to a navigation in that everyone begins life in a specific spot and situation and the travels toward an unkown destination, using what ever tools we have acquired in life to give direction; from this he adds that it is important to keep your awareness in the present and do the task at hand. This essay also contains an advertisement for a This I Believe LP album.

Phyllis Parker is reminded of a saying she was fond of as a child, "love conquers all" and describes the good and sometimes bad results that have come of love. She also compares love to electricity, a flow of energy, and says that if we could all harness love and direct it wisely the world could be a much better place without prejudice. In addition, this essay contains an advertisement for a This I Believe LP album.

Monroe Deustch expresses his belief that the sentiment of brotherhood between people could solve many of the world's problems and also expresses his belief that there is a greater power in the world that has created the Universe and that this power is immortal just as the spirit of people is immortal as well.

Alexis Kyrou, Director General of the Greek Ministry of Foreign Affairs, explains the confluence of belief and knowledge and the importance of his Greek heritage to his beliefes and enumerates what some of these are; cooperation, the importance of a spiritual life, patriotism, and repectt for others.

Clement Reicher recounts a short allegory he wrote as a child which formed the basis for his belief that love must be personal (not idea-driven) and unpossessive, in order to increase and lead ultimately to happiness.

Joe McNeil describes his beliefs in a God who created and watches over the universe, and in the power of preparing youth to impact their communities in tangible ways, no matter how seemingly small or insignificant.

Milton Katz describes how his experiences in another culture caused him to question the universal nature of his own values, but his reaction to world powers such as Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union led him to conclude that his values of freedom and justice and charity were true, after all.

Hadley Cantrell describes the differences between knowledge, beliefs, and emotions, and states his belief that human beings are essentially the same in their needs and aspirations, and that satisfaction comes through high quality work motivated by love.

Wallace Stegner describes his suspicions of "passionate faith" because of the religious intolerance it creates, and recounts his beliefs in virtues such as kindness and courage, and his belief that although consciences are developed differently, based on one's birthplace, nevertheless, people across the world share many values.

Richard Tucker describes his belief in honesty and keeping one's word, and recounts how he strives to teach his son that even so-called "white lies" still hurt the teller of the lie.

Margaret Runbeck describes her trip to India to combat illiteracy, and her belief that there is a spiritual revival underway, as people realize that rational intelligence alone cannot prevent "global suicide."

Freya Stark talks about her belief in immortality and the afterlife and how this view of eternity affects her perspective and gives her and affinity for sincerity and truth.

Richard Potter discusses his closes with nature as a child and his belief that there is much to be gained from living close to nature and more children must be raised with an awareness of nature.

Edward Sherman emphasizes the need for responsibility and sacrifice for the sake of the country and to preserve its leadership in the world, and lists his personal commandments, a "Decalogue of Civic Responsibility."

Moekarto Notowidigdo, Foreign Minister of the Republic of Indonesia, describes being in jail during the Indonesian push for independence, and witnessing the comraderie of prisoners from all socioeconomic statuses, which led them to sing the Indonesian National Anthem during an execution.

Kenneth Johnson talks of the importance of democracy, freedom and human welfare, and emphasizes the ethical principles that underlie our democratic ideals.

Ronald Kurtz, Electronic Technician in the United States Navy, describes many of his beliefs; his optimism for the future, the value of courage, the beauty of nature and God, reasons for his sentimnetal nature, and his connection to family.

Arthur Dodineau, superintendent of Detroit Public Schools, talks about the foundational experiences he had as a boy growing up on a farm in rural Michigan, and his faith in teachers, religion and the future of the United States.

Robert Cleland, head of the Research Group of the Huntington Library, describes a time in his life in which he was distraught and took a trip along the Colorado river with friends. The beauty he saw during the trip, Robert Cleland says, reinspired his life and faith.

Edwin Lukas speaks about the importance of tolerance and respect for other people, cultures and races and the negative impact prejudice can have on an individual and a community.

Gillie Potter states his belief in the power of wit and "foolishness" to communicate truth, and describes his belief that his task is to bring merriness back to a modern zeitgeist that is currently devoid of humor.

Sidney Wallach describes his belief in the golden mean, reasonableness, democracy, and the protection of the minority, especially the individual.

Jack Lutz describes his belief in the three dimensions of life: height, or success; breadth, or education and culture; and depth, or faith.

George Vierheller describes his beliefs in the importance of individual achievement, self-improvement, service to others, family, and friendship.

Asa Call describes his beliefs in moral and spiritual laws that, like the physical laws of nature, must be discovered and followed in order to succeed in life.

Sir Gerald Barry, Director General of the Festival of Britain, talks about the changes in the world after World War II, his relationship to christianity and his belief that there is no life after death and so one must appreciate and live one's own life to the fullest extent.

Emery Tobin, Editor and Founder of the Alaska Sportsman, describes his belief that people have been placed in a beautiful creation in order to work to improve themselves and to serve others.

Norman Angell describes his belief that evil will triumph over good in society unless indviduals recognize their own personal capacity for evil and strive to overcome this tendency through self-discipline.

Elon Borton envies his fathers unwavering faith in God and explains his own evolving faith in God; that He has a plan and a purpose for everyone.

Art Linkletter talks about his experiences in the entertainment industry as a host and announcer and how his focus on his own abilities, limits and performance, as well as his appreication of people, has contributed to his success.

Tinfu Tsiang describes his belief that China and the West each have valuable cultural insight to offer the other, and that the way to world peace is to focus on ulitizing existing resources more efficiently and to preserve human freedom in one's home country.

Milo Bekins describes his belief that society must invest in education so that the youth of today can bring the progress of tomorrow.

Bob Evans explains his belief in the individual and the individual's responsibility to oneself, to one's community, and to one's God, emphasizing the importance of equality, self respect and the Ten Commandments.

Ohio state senator Catherine Dobbs describes her beliefs that the Golden Rule teaches her how to live life, that nature's laws underlie the basic circumstances of life, that individuals are created in the image of God, that human nature is capable of great kindness and great cruelty, and that personal freedom is a right which comes from God.

Harry Schacter, president of the Kaufman-Straus Company, describes his belief in fighting for social justice: though one individual might not make a difference, he still has a right to choose the side upon which he fights.

Robert Heinlein talks about his beliefs in his neighbors--in their kindness and willingness to look out for each other, despite differences in opinions or creeeds. NOTE: This version has been abbreviated to include an advertisement after the essay. Contains advertisement for a book containing 100 "This I Believe" essays. Duplicate of the essay, complete and without the advertisement, is on XTV-18161 (Box 004).

Asa Call describes his beliefs in moral and spiritual laws that, like the physical laws of nature, must be discovered and adhered to for a successful life. NOTE: This version has been abbreviated to include an advertisement after the essay. Contains advertisement for a book containing 100 "This I Believe" essays. Duplicate of the essay, complete and without the advertisement, is on XTV-18161 (Box 004).

Walter White, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, recounts the challenges of growing up in a family of light-skinned African Americans (never fully accepted by either side), and describes his beliefs that an end must be obtained by just means, that love for humanity will overcome any obstacles, and that persons should not be judged by their skin color or creed. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Former President of the United States, Harry Truman, states that his moral code is based upon the Ten Commandments and the Sermon on the Mount, and describes his beliefs in the duty of a public official to work for the public welfare; in the value of the civil rights movement; and in the importance of preserving civil liberties, democracy, and freedom. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book, Volume II.

Margaret Chase Smith, U.S. Senator (Maine), describes the beliefs which make the discouragment of political work worthwhile: a belief in an individual's God-given purpose and rights, such as the right to consideration and courtesy from others, the right to criticize constructively, the right honestly to hold unpopular beliefs, the right to protest orderly, and the right of independent thought. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Dore Schary lists some of the beliefs he has acquired over the course of his life; the importance of family, equality of people, respect for law, democracy, patriotism, and concludes by describing the importance of wisdom to the past, present and future of the human race.

James B. Carey describes his belief in liberty for all humanity, based on his belief that all Americans are "displaced persons" (immigrants) and have the right to pursue the resources necessary to fulfill their basic physical and spiritual needs.

Interview was conducted on by Kristina Ceruzzi at Cortland Dugger's home. Present were Cortland Dugger and Kristina Ceruzzi.

Karl Nottingham explains our duty to adjust to society and some ways to do so such as; observing the Golden Rule, treating others with kindness, and helping those less fortunate, earning trust through friendship.

William Dalrymple lecture entitled "Return of a King: Shah Shuja and the First Anglo-Afghan War 1839-42"

Henry MacCracken describes the basic tenants of his personal philosophy--art, science, democracy, and religion--and how these four "points of the compass" are held together by freedom.

James Baxter describes his belief that the source of a country's freedom is its religion.

Chester Maxey describes the "creative force" that is vital to a meaningful society and how the United States' success is a result of its nourishing this creative spirit.

Robert McEwen describes his faith in people that he developed from working with young people in education and his belief in the adaptability of people in a dynamic universe.

Sunil Amrith lecture entitled "Islam in the Bay of Bengal: Between Tamil and Malay Worlds"

Robert Travers, Assoc. Professor, Department of History, Cornell University. Lecture entitled "The Connected World of Haji Mustapha: an informer to the British in eighteenth century Bengal"

Partha Chatterjee lecture entitled "Early Modern Absolutism in 18th Century India"