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General Hershey laments society's fascination with technological progress and opines that society would be better off if people focused on understanding themselves, others around them and their relationships with one another.

Lewis Hoskins recalls a time when he was taken prisoner by a chinese soldier while providing humanitarian aid and his ability to find a common humanity and brotherliness with his captor that disarmed the fear and violence of the situation.

Genevieve B. Earle remembers the surprise of seeing poverty as a child and how she developed a belief in the benefits of a strong government to promote laws and provide for its citizens although she says that can only happen when the people are engaged as active, equal partners in the work of a city.

Robert Heinlein talks about his beliefs in his neighbors--in their kindness and willingness to look out for each other, despite differences in opinions or creeds.

Alfred Landon describes his belief in the ability of people to achieve monumental progress for society, and in the need to maintain a grasp of spiritual and moral truths in the midst of that progress.

Osceola Dawson describes her beliefs in the fatherhood of God, the brotherhood and equality of humanity, the Bible as the "infallible guide to conduct," and the home as "the foundation of society."

Dr. Saul's beliefs are shaped by his experiences in science and he describes his conviction that the fight-or-flight reaction and suffering in childhood can lead to developmental problems as adults; modern society must focus its energy on developing emotionally mature adults for future harmony.

Lou Crandall uses the analogy of construction to describe his belief that young people are foundations upon which a strong, straight character must be built, and looks to Biblical characters for examples of steadfast integrity.

Wilson Compton describes the influence of his Presbyterian parents on his beliefs (including his mother's child-rearing philosophy of "The Bible, soap, and spinach"), and he explains how the Golden Rule is a concept found in all of the major world religions.

Joseph Harsch describes his beliefs in the value of always moving forward (rather than stagnating) and in the importance of helping others.

Paul Helms describes his work with the Ford Foundation, as well as the impact his Christian upbringing has had on his beliefs, including his belief that giving 10% of his income results in tangible blessings.

Howard Spalding describes his belief in a divine spark that exists within every person and which spurs creative invention and moral reasoning, and states his belief that happiness is achieved through the ability to use creative intelligence in the service of others.

Senator Lehman describes his two basic beliefs: First, one should give back to society according to what he or she has received, and secondly, one should extend respect to the opinions and beliefs of others.

Albert Guerard describes his beliefs as a blend of old and new ideals that espouse liberty, progress, tolerance, and charity.

Richard Salmon ponders the magnitude of the universe and describes his realization that everything is part of God's plan and how fishing teaches him to make the best of life.

Enseng Ho lecture entitled Burial and Travel: Islam across Indian Ocean Cultures.

Justice Douglas explains his father's last words and why faith, like his father's, is necessary to ensure freedom and guide people and nations through difficult times.

Justice Douglas explains his father's last words and why faith, like his father's, is necessary to ensure freedom and guide people and nations through difficult times.

Norman Cousins elaborates on the play of free will and determinism in the development of people and society and the detrimental affects fear can have on this development.