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Lewis Hoskins recalls a time when he was taken prisoner by a chinese soldier while providing humanitarian aid and his ability to find a common humanity and brotherliness with his captor that disarmed the fear and violence of the situation.

Lord Birkett explains that, despite his firsthand experiences at the Nuremberg Trials, he still has faith in the inherent goodness of people and their ability to progress towards a peaceful future.

Anne Rombeau describes her belief in the unity of nature and humanity, with each piece contributing as it freely chooses, and recounts an experience in which she overcame a physical ailment to continue her life of travel and flying. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Charles Abrams tells of his faith in man despite his frequent uncertainty when confronted with the realities of war, greed and other instances of human weakness. However, he remains devoted to the ability of man to rely on his conscience to someday improve and perfect the world in which we live.

Liberal Member of Parliament for the Isle of Anglesey (1929-1951) and Deputy Leader of the British Liberal Party (1949-1951), Megan Lloyd George states how her generation, which grew up during WWI, has never known true peace, and describes her belief that one's perspective will never be quite accurate with a spiritual component.

Gene Harris describes his belief that following "natural laws" in one's daily life will help build a "storm-proof philosophic anchorage."

J. Arthur Rank expressees his faith in God and humanity and the power of faith to transform the world in to a peaceful society.

Harold Stassen describes Albert Schweitzer's life and his philosophy of "reverance for life," and from this explains why people yearn for freedom and dictatorships can never stop this yearning.

Clyde Hoey, former North Carolina U.S. Senator and Governor, describes how his faith in God helped him to overcome childhood fears of walking home in the dark, and supported him through life's challenges, a happy marriage, and the death of his spouse.

Lou Crandall uses the analogy of construction to describe his belief that young people are foundations upon which a strong, straight character must be built, and looks to Biblical characters for examples of steadfast integrity.