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Albert Guerard describes his beliefs as a blend of old and new ideals that espouse liberty, progress, tolerance, and charity.

Maurice Edelman describes his youthful ideal of creating a more just society that prompted him to go into British politics, his eventual disillusionment and cynicism, and the reawakening of his ideal through a visit to the site of Struthof, a former Nazi concentration camp.

Alfred Noyes describes his belief that the complexity of the world can only be attributed to God, and that the clearest revelation of God can be found by looking at the human soul. Contains a short advertisement for This I Believe book (this essay included in the book).

Edith Evans describes how she believes that good is stronger than evil, that following Christ's command to love God and one's neighbors will bring about a better world, and that fear of war and social chaos can be answered by relying on the power of good to overcome.

Uday Shankar describes his belief that his own career path was a result of God's all-powerful will, and that his talents (and those of others) are God's creative force manifest through him.

Lord Kemsley describes his beliefs in the importance of family life, home-made entertainment, and self-reliance.

Lucile Watson recounts her childhood discovery of the knowledge that she could change herself for the better, and, after successes with simple things such as maintaining her hair and quitting nail-biting, she developed a philosophy for life, including a belief that God was in everything and made everything.

Christmas Humphreys recounts his search for beliefs that he could live by, and states his beliefs in the Four Noble Truths of Buddhism.

William Dalrymple lecture entitled "Return of a King: Shah Shuja and the First Anglo-Afghan War 1839-42"