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Lewis Hoskins recalls a time when he was taken prisoner by a chinese soldier while providing humanitarian aid and his ability to find a common humanity and brotherliness with his captor that disarmed the fear and violence of the situation.

Lord Birkett explains that, despite his firsthand experiences at the Nuremberg Trials, he still has faith in the inherent goodness of people and their ability to progress towards a peaceful future.

Anne Rombeau describes her belief in the unity of nature and humanity, with each piece contributing as it freely chooses, and recounts an experience in which she overcame a physical ailment to continue her life of travel and flying. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Charles Abrams tells of his faith in man despite his frequent uncertainty when confronted with the realities of war, greed and other instances of human weakness. However, he remains devoted to the ability of man to rely on his conscience to someday improve and perfect the world in which we live.

Liberal Member of Parliament for the Isle of Anglesey (1929-1951) and Deputy Leader of the British Liberal Party (1949-1951), Megan Lloyd George states how her generation, which grew up during WWI, has never known true peace, and describes her belief that one's perspective will never be quite accurate with a spiritual component.

Gene Harris describes his belief that following "natural laws" in one's daily life will help build a "storm-proof philosophic anchorage."

J. Arthur Rank expressees his faith in God and humanity and the power of faith to transform the world in to a peaceful society.

Harold Stassen describes Albert Schweitzer's life and his philosophy of "reverance for life," and from this explains why people yearn for freedom and dictatorships can never stop this yearning.

Clyde Hoey, former North Carolina U.S. Senator and Governor, describes how his faith in God helped him to overcome childhood fears of walking home in the dark, and supported him through life's challenges, a happy marriage, and the death of his spouse.

Lou Crandall uses the analogy of construction to describe his belief that young people are foundations upon which a strong, straight character must be built, and looks to Biblical characters for examples of steadfast integrity.

Helen Keller describes her faith in God, in immortality, and in her fellow human beings, as well as her confidence that social conditions are improving, despite the present sufferings of humanity. Helen Keller describes her faith in God, in immortality, and in her fellow human beings, as well as her confidence that social conditions are improving, despite the present sufferings of humanity. Helen Keller describes her faith in God, in immortality, and in her fellow human beings, as well as her confidence that social conditions are improving, despite the present sufferings of humanity. Helen Keller describes her faith in God, in immortality, and in her fellow human beings, as well as her confidence that social conditions are improving, despite the present sufferings of humanity.

Philosophy 167: Class 1 - Part 2 Basic Astronomy: The Celestial Sphere

In this repeat broadcast, Nobel Prize winner Thomas Mann discusses the impermanent and transitory nature of life and explains why it is that this makes life special and valuable, and why mans awareness of impermanence elevates his spirit. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Harry Overstreet describes how Socrates has influenced his thinking, leading to the beliefs that truth must be sought out (rather than accepted) and that knowledge about the world can never be exhausted, and forming the foundation for his tolerant acceptance of his fellow human beings.

Fred Fagg recalls a moment when his life was saved by a handhold at the edge of a cliff and uses this story to explain the importance of his own "spiritual handholds."

Lee Bristol describes his belief in the individual, the individual's role in achieving peace and acquiring happiness through humor, service to others, and faith.

Aniket De, Muhammad Mustafa Monowar, Sara Mehnaz, Ishrat Jahan Prioti, From Medina to Malacca: The Spread of Sufism

Bentz Plagemann describes his experience in the Navy during WWII and the resulting belief that with patience and faith there are no difficulties one cannot overcome in life.

Albert Guerard describes his beliefs as a blend of old and new ideals that espouse liberty, progress, tolerance, and charity.

Mr. and Mrs. Hale, having been married for a long time, talk of the imminent death that will separate them as they age, and inspite of the expected grief they will continue to see life with excitement and wonder, and remind all of the importance to have compassion for everyone.

Maurice Edelman describes his youthful ideal of creating a more just society that prompted him to go into British politics, his eventual disillusionment and cynicism, and the reawakening of his ideal through a visit to the site of Struthof, a former Nazi concentration camp.

Red Barber talks about the spirit of the athlete and how this exemplifies the importance of spirit in life.

Douglas Fairbanks describes his fathers resistance to his acting career, and difficulties starting his political carreer and how he overcame obstacles through his determination.

Fulton Oursler explains why faith and love are the two most important prinicples in his life and how to practice them.

Enseng Ho lecture entitled Burial and Travel: Islam across Indian Ocean Cultures.

Lou Austin describes his belief that persons are meant to be in partnership with God, and how it took 40 years of fruitless struggle for him to learn this.

Justice Douglas explains his father's last words and why faith, like his father's, is necessary to ensure freedom and guide people and nations through difficult times.

Justice Douglas explains his father's last words and why faith, like his father's, is necessary to ensure freedom and guide people and nations through difficult times.

Harry McAlpin describes his belief in the importance of justice and equality, and the challenges of living that creed as an African American in America.

Grove Patterson describes his belief in a Supreme Power who created the universe, in immortality, in the efficacy of prayer, in the existence of natural law, in the existence of evil caused by humans, and in the courage to face rather than withdraw from the world's problems.

Bonaro Overstreet talks about her doubt and her one certain belief, that we must all act towards one another with good will and kindness because people are intimately connected and the notion of individuality is a misperception.

Quentin Reynolds explains why he would first burn the Bible if he were a dictator: the Bible is the source of democracy and its stories tell of the power of individuality and non-conformity which make a dictatorship impossible, according to Reynolds.

President Hoover describes the importance of religious faith in life, science, and politics.

President Hoover describes the importance of religious faith in life, science, and politics. A duplicate of this essay is on reel XTV-16923 (Box 002).

Interview conducted on 2/13/05 by Sam Stiegler at Oscar Greene's home in West Medford.

Writer Pearl S. Buck finds her faith in humanity to be stronger than ever, shares her affinity for life, and believes that cooperation can solve the worlds problems.

Lucius D. Clay describes being inspired by the German people's desire for democracy following World War II and believes that all people want peace and liberty and also believes freedom is a privilege given by God, and one that must be carefully guarded by all citizens and he calls upon Americans to make this country one that provides equal opportunities for all.

Frank La Forge describes his work and achievements in his career as a musician and pianist and believes in the necessity of acting to the best of one's ability and faith in God's support of one's efforts.

Theodore Heubener describes how he came to believe that suffering had a purpose, either as the result of a person's transgression of the natural order of the universe, or as the basis through which one's character is formed.

Reverend Irvin Underhill believes that good things can come out of adversity when one keeps faith and he recalls an experience in Africa in which fear and danger led him to peace and tranquility.

Charles Bennett explains the importance of loyalty in Congress and in combat and also believes that individuals must repent for one's sins and develop strong faith to make the world a peaceful place.

Ella Mae Howey states her belief in a personal, loving God who provides abundant life opportunities, and describes how learning to manage her condition of hearing loss taught her to believe in her power to respond positively to life's challenges.

Leonard Bernstein describes his belief in the importance and dignity of individuals, and in the future of America as a leader in science, art, and human progress. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

William Maners states his belief that he is the product of his thoughts, and describes his process to replace past negative thoughts with positive ones. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

William Zorach believes that people have had their faith strained and that it is important to get in touch with one's creative ability to communcate and define one's feelings in order to progress towards a world of happiness and prosperity.

Arthur Motley, president and publisher of Parade magazine, describes his expereince wathcing "Death of a Salesman" and his reaction ot the portrayal the negative portrayal of salesman and why he believes salesman and selling are synonymous with change, progress, action and is like life in miniature.

Nazrat Farooki, Art teacher at Punjab University, recalls her father's and grandfather's constant search for knowledge and how she now shares this passion. She also adds why she believes that learning and understanding can lead to peace and securtiy in the world.

Alfred Noyes describes his belief that the complexity of the world can only be attributed to God, and that the clearest revelation of God can be found by looking at the human soul. Contains a short advertisement for This I Believe book (this essay included in the book).

Elizabeth Vining describes how she used to depend on human love for meaning and satisfaction till her husband was killed in an automobile accident, and then she came to believe in God's love and the efficacy of prayer. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Victor Andrade, Bolivian Ambassador to the United States, describes how he explained the concept of electricity to his son, and states his beliefs that the soul, like electricity, is an unseen force; that a moral order exists; that happiness must be based on immaterial, rather than material, means; and that all individuals are equal. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Agnes Moorehead describes her beliefs in the efficacy of prayer, the joy of self-improvement, the necessity of truth, the challenges of an acting career, and the responsibility of an individual to live an honest life. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Chester Bowles, Ambassador to India and Nepal and former Governor of Connecticut, describes his belief that an adequate response to the threat of the nuclear age will require cooperation from all sectors of humanity, and that the issue of world poverty must be addressed. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Henry Cowell describes his belief in music as a medium through which a composer may communicate a humanizing philosophy to others, and states his beliefs in the Golden Rule, equality, indvidualism, freedom, and the responsibility to behave ethically in exchange for participation in society. Contains a short advertisement for This I Believe book (this essay included in the book).

Edith Evans describes how she believes that good is stronger than evil, that following Christ's command to love God and one's neighbors will bring about a better world, and that fear of war and social chaos can be answered by relying on the power of good to overcome.

Paul Douglas, U.S. Senator (Illinois) and Professor of Industrial Relations at the University of Chicago, describes his belief that he must work towards achieving a "fellowship of friends," spreading love and good-will in his community and the world, but that armed restistance to groups such as the Nazis and Communists is justified. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

62. The Chase

Arthur Connell, National Commander of the American Legion, describes his belief that every human being has a purpose from God and the potential to do good, and that every circumstance happens for a reason, even the death of his only daughter. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Florence Allen, Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, explains her worry over the "deterioration of the human spirit" and her belief that faith and intelligence and the fair application of law may restore the human spirit and through law create a peacful planet. Audio includes an advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Arthur Deakin, General Secretary of the Transport and General Workers' Union, states his beliefs both in an individual's responsibility to serve others and in the individual's right to freedom of conscience and expression. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Raymond Allen, Chancellor of UCLA, describes the impact his family had on teaching him responsibility and other beliefs such as the necessity of family and describes the beliefs he holds close, such as the importance of kindness,the perfectabiloity of man, the need for faith and freedom to worship, and the value of creativity. This essay also contains an advertisement for a This I Believe LP album.

Phyllis Parker is reminded of a saying she was fond of as a child, "love conquers all" and describes the good and sometimes bad results that have come of love. She also compares love to electricity, a flow of energy, and says that if we could all harness love and direct it wisely the world could be a much better place without prejudice. In addition, this essay contains an advertisement for a This I Believe LP album.

Mrs. Pillsbury describes how she developed faith and belief in God and also her belief in the goodness of people and that we each have abilites they have been given to us for a purpose.

Monroe Deustch expresses his belief that the sentiment of brotherhood between people could solve many of the world's problems and also expresses his belief that there is a greater power in the world that has created the Universe and that this power is immortal just as the spirit of people is immortal as well.

William James describes how an experience during World War II gave him a belief in his dependence on God and an appreciation for life, and how he strives to be sensitive to others' beliefs and avoid speaking unkindly to them.

Dora Dodge talks about her work with the girls club and the importance of planning and faith.

Edina Campbell Dover discusses her guiding philosophy to behave in the same manner as she imagines Jesus Christ would, and the outcomes of this philosophy in her life and work and also explains the need for prayer, and its importance, on a frequent and regular basis.

Henry Taylor, President of Taylor and Caldwell, explains his belief that everything operates based on the principals of certain laws, weather they be natural, physical, social, or religious and failure to adhere to these laws inevitably results in disfuntion and chaos; and the supreme law would be the law of God.

Peter Scott describes his belief in painting and science as a means by which to discover truth, and describes the wide variety of interests that provide him a busy life.

Edith Sams describes how a childhood encounter with a handicapped individual inspired her to enter social work as a career, and her belief that the efforts of individuals can make an impact on the world.

W. C. Locker describes his beliefs in God's omnipotence, in his own responsibility to live according to God's plan for his life, and in the role that work plays to make the inner qualities of love visible to others.

Ernest Melby talks about his belief in the individuality of people and the need for freedom and liberty in order for people to develop to the greatest potential.

George Haynes, executive director of the National Urban League, describes his beliefs in the equal potential of humans, in beauty, truth, goodness, peace, life, God, and eternity.

Joe McNeil describes his beliefs in a God who created and watches over the universe, and in the power of preparing youth to impact their communities in tangible ways, no matter how seemingly small or insignificant.

Barbarba Davenport states her belief that world peace can be achieved through a shifting of focus towards the oneness (rather than difference) of humanity.

Arthur Gill describes his belief that children's dreams are his hope for the creativity, innovation, progress, and peace of the future.

Rubin Gotesky relates an experience of feeling part of yet aloof from the universe, and describes his belief that though isolation is an essential part of the self, his actions do matter and can help to change the world.

Milton Katz describes how his experiences in another culture caused him to question the universal nature of his own values, but his reaction to world powers such as Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union led him to conclude that his values of freedom and justice and charity were true, after all.

John Sinclair, president of the National Industrial Conference Board, describes his belief that faith in an immortal soul, prayer, knowledge of the truth, and humility will help him overcome discouragement, cynicism, and the fear of death.

Magnus Kristoffersen describes how reading has shaped his life, and describes the lessons he has derived from stories: from Sutton Vane's Outward Bound, he has learned that he must give a final account of his actions, and from Selma Lagerlof's Jerusalem, he has learned that trying to save one's life at the expense of others merely backfires in the end.

John Gassner describes his abhorrence of dogma and his belief that humanism is the belief system that can enable humanity to make scientific progress without destroying itself.

Wade Hampton lists his beliefs, some of which are: humility, faith, and respect for others, and the moral order of the universe.

Bennet Schauffler talks about the importance of keeping active in order to find happiness, that if one enjoys what one is doing and works at it one has no time, or inclination, to argue or fight with others. boredom and inactivity have led people to conflict and materialistic greed.

Wallace Stegner describes his suspicions of "passionate faith" because of the religious intolerance it creates, and recounts his beliefs in virtues such as kindness and courage, and his belief that although consciences are developed differently, based on one's birthplace, nevertheless, people across the world share many values.

Joseph Klacsman describes his simple faith and the happiness he derives from serving a wide variety of passengers during his work as a Pullman conductor.

Mary Belden, president and treasurer of Belden Frosting Company, describes her beliefs in the brotherhood of individuals, the need for tolerance, the importance of listening to the other side of an argument, the dignity of human beings, the need to remember the past, and her confidence that Christianity will triumph over other philosophies, dispelling fear and uncertainty.

Harold Clurman describes how difficult the theater field was during the Great Depression, but expresses his love and motivations for being in theater and his desire to serve others.

J. Warren Day recounts how looking at ripples in a lake made him realize that all of his actions and life choices have consequences, and describes his belief that a life of service, especially in helping children learn about God, is the most unselfish and Christian life he can imagine.

George Higginbotham, president of the Consolidation Coal Company, describes his "principle of kindness" (a resolve to avoid hurting others), his "principle of self-analysis" (a process of self-reflection which determines personal faults and ways in which to overcome them), and his "principle of tolerance" (a belief that because God is compassionate and forgiving, he should be as well).

Ellen Carpenter describes her belief that prayer works and that the answer to the poverty and problems of the world is a spiritual one.

Frank Dalley, office manager at the Utah Department of Employment Securit and National Gaurdsman, recounts his expereineces in the Korean War and how he relied on prayer for guidance and his determination to try to help others and relieve human suffering in whatever way he could.

Eric Warner Johnson describes his beliefs in the freedom of conscience, in the brotherhood of humanity, in the importance of living one's faith in practical action, and in the value of speaking the truth, even at personal risk. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Edward Sherman emphasizes the need for responsibility and sacrifice for the sake of the country and to preserve its leadership in the world, and lists his personal commandments, a "Decalogue of Civic Responsibility."

Etienne Dupuch describes how his newspaper has been run in humble reliance on God, and describes his belief in the efficacy of prayer and in freedom from fear of death.

Harry Blake describes a conversation with his sons in which they discuss the need for faith, hope, and charity to attain a succesful and happy life.

Louis Wehle describes the concept of spiritual perfection, and while this goal may be unattainable, the pursuit is worthwhile, and this is the only effort that can give true and enduring satisfaction.