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Bobby Doerr, second baseman for the Boston Red Sox, describes his belief that it is better to help his teammates through simple actions than to make a flashy play that only causes problems for the team.

Arthur Connell, National Commander of the American Legion, describes his belief that every human being has a purpose from God and the potential to do good, and that every circumstance happens for a reason, even the death of his only daughter. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Edina Campbell Dover discusses her guiding philosophy to behave in the same manner as she imagines Jesus Christ would, and the outcomes of this philosophy in her life and work and also explains the need for prayer, and its importance, on a frequent and regular basis.

Heloise Broeg describes her belief in the importance of human relationships, love, work, and knowledge.

Doris Almy explains how her trust in the omnipotence of God and the reestablishment of her faith allowed her to overcome her fears and anxiety, and discusses her belief in kindness and education as a relief from anxiety in the lives of others.

Harry Blake describes a conversation with his sons in which they discuss the need for faith, hope, and charity to attain a succesful and happy life.

Harry Dietrich describes how his family background, his teachers, and the tools and techniques invented by doctors of previous generations have all equipped him to achieve healing more effectively than ever before, and his belief that his responsibility is to help dispel fear in his patients.

Harry Levenson relates his experience as a musician to the struggles of people in the world and explains his belief that doing ones best and appreciating the the individual as a perosn can guide us towards a peaceful future.

Laura Crandon of the Horace Mann School for the Deaf states her belief that the world's problems could be addressed if individuals viewed humanity as an interconnected society in which each individual has a part to play.

Headmaster of St. Paul Academy, John DeQuedville Briggs describes his beliefs in honesty, trustworthiness, and the Golden Rule; and explains how his experience of other people living by these beliefs provides him hope for the future, despite the prevailing spirit of pessimism.

Joseph Weinreb reflects on ethics and morality and resolves that nothing is created bad or evil but becomes so Joseph Weinrab reflects on ethics and morality and resolves that nothing is created bad or evil but becomes so misdirection and love, compassion, and hard work are means by which we can achieve a harmonious world.

You Chan Yang describes his hope that he has made a difference in the lives of injured or disabled persons during his tenure on earth, and relates a story in which a boy discovers that only God knows the definition of goodness.

Henry Murray describes his belief that the world will not be able to progress and escape the threat of atomic war until a synthesized philosophy of eastern and western ideals can be adopted by thousands, and a world government achieved.

Thomas Dowd proudly describes the difficulties endured by his mother and the enduring spirit, faith and dignity she displayed throughout her life as well as his determination to emulate the character of his mother.

Walter Reiling, President of Optimist International, describes his belief that all persons have a right to happiness, which is dependent upon the ability to achieve one's aspirations, and upon a freedom from fear.

Margaret Mead describes her belief that humans are born with the same inherent abilities, but each is formed by the culture in which he or she grows up; Mead believes it is through our relationship to civilation that we derive meaning, and that we must strive to build a civilation whose future is secure and free. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Edwin Earle recounts a lesson from a painting instructor at art school and the impact they had on him later in life when coping with his blindess and other adversity.

Bert Whitehurst describes how waiting for a spinal fusion surgery brought him to a belief in prayer and released him from the fear of death.

John Burchard admits his fear, and describes his belief that life cannot be lived in fear, and that the solution in the face of the current threats to "Western Civilization" is to embrace the diversity that America was founded upon, and to strive for union between world nations, despite such a union's newness and unfamiliarity.