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Charles Taft talks about God's love and the necessity to strive to be worthy of his love but understanding one's imperfections as well, and how he tries to connect the sublime with the more practical aspects of life through hard work and introspection.

Barry Bingham explains the effect that war had on his upbringing and how contemplation while in the Pacific Islands led him to the awareness that he must work to the best of his ability to earn and deserve God's friendship, as must all people.

Caroline Duer describes most of her beliefs through a poem she wrote which emphasizes the value of enjoying simple pleasures, showing kindness and courtesy, working, avoiding excessive caution, meeting obligations, being courageous, showing tolerance, and avoiding regrets, for "the day is dark; it may be fair tomorrow." This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Lily Pons describes how she learned to deal with stage fright, and how an inner voice helped her persevere to become an opera singer.

Maximilian Hodder describes his experiences in prewar Poland, as a prisoner sent to a Siberian concentration camp, and as an immigrant to America, and summarizes his beliefs with the conviction that humanity is more good than evil, that individuals have a right to live the life of their choice, and that he has the responsibility to work to end oppression.

Edward Mann describes the simple truths that he believes are the root of his happines; faith in God, service to others, and friendships.

Theodore Heubener describes how he came to believe that suffering had a purpose, either as the result of a person's transgression of the natural order of the universe, or as the basis through which one's character is formed.

Denis Brogan explains that he doesn't share the certainty or types of belief that many adherents of world religions claim, but he does believe that love is better than hate, and that the love of friends gives meaning to life.

Edmond Rieder describes how his experiences with hotel guests have established his belief in the basic goodness of people, and he believes that praticing the Golden Rule and trying his best at his endeavors has led to satisfaction.

Ben Burman describes his beliefs in the value of kindness, the importance of striving for artistic excellence, and the utility of humor as an anecdote to pretension and tyranny. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.