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Margaret Hickey recalls her childhood when her father read the Bible to the famiy, and describes how her faith must be an active one of service.

Dr. Saul's beliefs are shaped by his experiences in science and he describes his conviction that the fight-or-flight reaction and suffering in childhood can lead to developmental problems as adults; modern society must focus its energy on developing emotionally mature adults for future harmony.

In a recording aired posthumously, Samuel Shellabarger describes his beliefs in his dependence upon God for eternal life, in the existence of natural laws that govern values and morality, and in the value of using the past to inform future decisions.

Harold Stassen describes Albert Schweitzer's life and his philosophy of "reverance for life," and from this explains why people yearn for freedom and dictatorships can never stop this yearning.

Harold Evans recalls his relationship with Count Bernadotte who was assasinated while a Mediator on a U.N. peace keeping effort, and compares him with President Abraham Lincoln as two men with conviction, faith and integrity and examples of the type of individuals people can look up to to create prosperity and peace in the world for everyone.

Clyde Hoey, former North Carolina U.S. Senator and Governor, describes how his faith in God helped him to overcome childhood fears of walking home in the dark, and supported him through life's challenges, a happy marriage, and the death of his spouse.

Lou Crandall uses the analogy of construction to describe his belief that young people are foundations upon which a strong, straight character must be built, and looks to Biblical characters for examples of steadfast integrity.

Percy Spender, Australian ambassador to the United States, explains how and why it is important for people to consider the future one is leaving for the following generation and that it is our duty to create a better world, in which they can live without fear, for the next generation.

Helen Keller describes her faith in God, in immortality, and in her fellow human beings, as well as her confidence that social conditions are improving, despite the present sufferings of humanity. Helen Keller describes her faith in God, in immortality, and in her fellow human beings, as well as her confidence that social conditions are improving, despite the present sufferings of humanity. Helen Keller describes her faith in God, in immortality, and in her fellow human beings, as well as her confidence that social conditions are improving, despite the present sufferings of humanity. Helen Keller describes her faith in God, in immortality, and in her fellow human beings, as well as her confidence that social conditions are improving, despite the present sufferings of humanity.

Charles Taft talks about God's love and the necessity to strive to be worthy of his love but understanding one's imperfections as well, and how he tries to connect the sublime with the more practical aspects of life through hard work and introspection.