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Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

I think....I don't know weather it know I was named by Rabindra Nath Tagore, my name was Nabaneeta, Nabaneeta means newly brought in....or newly born or newly married, so Naba is more new than Neeta is the others. So she....this is name that he gave me, and I have been very lucky I must say because I was three years old when he died.

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

The address of your childhood home
80B Vivekananda Road and it is a high road; one of the prominent roads of north Kolkata and it is almost a corridor which links up Vivekananda's ancestors' home and Tagore's ancestors' home. That way, it's a cultural path and we grew up in the atmosphere also in those days.

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

The most famous member was Kali Prasanna Singha. He was a very important literate figure who wrote this Hutum Penchar Naksa thats now being re-edited and published. Some of these I can supplement with actual documentation later on if you wish. So, the Singha's then called Singhi-badi were very major Calcutta family. And you know, we were kayasthas [kayastha] . As with Brahmins, so with the Kayasthas', within the Kayastha samaj or the community there were two kinds of Kayasthas. One is abhijat, who were kind of the aristocratic kayasthas and householders, grihastha. This is been the place where we started the Sovabazar Rajbari, Sovabazar's Raja's of course and they were also kind of rivals to Tagore's and singha's were very important so my great grandfather married into Singha family and this was the lady who was called

This was the period of racism of the Raj... the early Raj.
1860s.... massive kind of uproar among the Europeans in Calcutta. But Ripon, the liberal Viceroy, wanted to push this through. And he was. Ramesh Mitter was also the earliest members of Congress as well. He was quite conservative I believe and he supported Tilak and he was in an age of consent and he didn't actually want it to be raised. It's quite interesting. He was one branch of the family, the other branch, his brother. His brother's son I believe was my great grand father and his name was very complicated. Tripundreswar Mitra but they all called him Tipen Mitra. He obviously a very bright lad I believe and the Singha's of Jorasanko. In Jorasanko there were actually two families that were very important. One was the Tagore family and the other was the Singha family.

Interviewed in Oxford, United Kingdom by Kris Manjapra