Search

Search Results

Albert Nesbitt describes how his successful life as a manufacturer left him feeling dissatisfied; it wasn't until he began to apply the Golden Rule, to engage with his factory union workers as people with legitimate points of view, and become involved in YMCA service, that the emptiness left him as he practiced what he calls Christian principles. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Dick Powell talks of the simple adages that have shaped his views of life, and his faith and describes his desire to pass them on to his children.

David Levy, Deputy District Attorney of Contra Costa County in California, describes how he learned level-headed contentment in order to survive as a POW on the Death March of Bataan during WWII.

Ahmad Zaki Abu Shadi describes his belief in freedom and justice, first developed through books, and then strengthened through his own life experiences that caused him to leave Egypt and ultimately move to the United States.

In this repeat broadcast, Nobel Prize winner Thomas Mann discusses the impermanent and transitory nature of life and explains why it is that this makes life special and valuable, and why mans awareness of impermanence elevates his spirit. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Constance Warren discusses the importance of education to happiness and ethics and describes the values that have made her life a happy one.

Harry Overstreet describes how Socrates has influenced his thinking, leading to the beliefs that truth must be sought out (rather than accepted) and that knowledge about the world can never be exhausted, and forming the foundation for his tolerant acceptance of his fellow human beings.

Fred Fagg recalls a moment when his life was saved by a handhold at the edge of a cliff and uses this story to explain the importance of his own "spiritual handholds."

Professor of Surgery at the University of Minnesota and Surgeon at the Mayo Clinic of Rochester, Dr. Mayo tells of his belief in a purpose to everything in life; the need for compassion and respect for other people; how science supports his faith and belief in the immaterial; our responsibility to help others; and the value of humor in life.

Lee Bristol describes his belief in the individual, the individual's role in achieving peace and acquiring happiness through humor, service to others, and faith.