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General Hershey laments society's fascination with technological progress and opines that society would be better off if people focused on understanding themselves, others around them and their relationships with one another.

Lewis Hoskins recalls a time when he was taken prisoner by a chinese soldier while providing humanitarian aid and his ability to find a common humanity and brotherliness with his captor that disarmed the fear and violence of the situation.

Pat Frank describes his experiences as a war correspondent with Edward R. Murrow during World War II; explains how his interactions with Germans, Japanese, and Italians give him hope that people share a fundamental humanity; and notes that the chance to watch history unfold is a great opportunity and responsibility, despite the uncertainty of the era.

Lord Birkett explains that, despite his firsthand experiences at the Nuremberg Trials, he still has faith in the inherent goodness of people and their ability to progress towards a peaceful future.

Anne Rombeau describes her belief in the unity of nature and humanity, with each piece contributing as it freely chooses, and recounts an experience in which she overcame a physical ailment to continue her life of travel and flying. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Charles Abrams tells of his faith in man despite his frequent uncertainty when confronted with the realities of war, greed and other instances of human weakness. However, he remains devoted to the ability of man to rely on his conscience to someday improve and perfect the world in which we live.

Newbold Morris describes the American spirit and howthat spirit is exemplified though progressive, democratic values and their corresponding government programs.

Genevieve B. Earle remembers the surprise of seeing poverty as a child and how she developed a belief in the benefits of a strong government to promote laws and provide for its citizens although she says that can only happen when the people are engaged as active, equal partners in the work of a city.

Jonathan Daniels, editor of the News and Observer, relates a story from his religious upbrining about the remarkable testimonials told in his religious community and explains that equality of all men before God is what drew him to the Episcopalian Church.

Roger Ansell, associate editor of Holiday Magazine, describes his belief in the need for skepticism rather than arrogant certainty, in his hope that civilization will advance through the current anxious age, in the importance of seeing society's maturation as a point yet to come in the future, in the realization of the humanity of others, and in the refreshing openness of children.

Robert Heinlein talks about his beliefs in his neighbors--in their kindness and willingness to look out for each other, despite differences in opinions or creeds.

Upton Sinclair describes the military (Navy) and religious (Episcopalian) background of his family, and his own choice to defend his country and bring change through his writing.

Gilbert Murray describes the religious importance of poetry in his life and how his experiences in WWI guided his efforts to prevent future war.

Ralph "Babe" Pinelli describes his beliefs in the importance of God, a strong marriage and family, religious training that starts in the home, a country that supports freedom of conscience, and baseball.

Liberal Member of Parliament for the Isle of Anglesey (1929-1951) and Deputy Leader of the British Liberal Party (1949-1951), Megan Lloyd George states how her generation, which grew up during WWI, has never known true peace, and describes her belief that one's perspective will never be quite accurate with a spiritual component.

Gene Harris describes his belief that following "natural laws" in one's daily life will help build a "storm-proof philosophic anchorage."

J. Arthur Rank expressees his faith in God and humanity and the power of faith to transform the world in to a peaceful society.

Malcolm Muggeridge, Editor of Punch Magazine, talks about the immutability, or changelessness, of life and imperfection of the human condition; however, he emphasizes the need to accept the imperfection and permanence and appreciate life for what it is and not what one hopes it may be one day.

Alfred Landon describes his belief in the ability of people to achieve monumental progress for society, and in the need to maintain a grasp of spiritual and moral truths in the midst of that progress.

Osceola Dawson describes her beliefs in the fatherhood of God, the brotherhood and equality of humanity, the Bible as the "infallible guide to conduct," and the home as "the foundation of society."