Search

Search Results

Robert Heinlein talks about his beliefs in his neighbors--in their kindness and willingness to look out for each other, despite differences in opinions or creeds.

Upton Sinclair describes the military (Navy) and religious (Episcopalian) background of his family, and his own choice to defend his country and bring change through his writing.

Gilbert Murray describes the religious importance of poetry in his life and how his experiences in WWI guided his efforts to prevent future war.

Ralph "Babe" Pinelli describes his beliefs in the importance of God, a strong marriage and family, religious training that starts in the home, a country that supports freedom of conscience, and baseball.

Liberal Member of Parliament for the Isle of Anglesey (1929-1951) and Deputy Leader of the British Liberal Party (1949-1951), Megan Lloyd George states how her generation, which grew up during WWI, has never known true peace, and describes her belief that one's perspective will never be quite accurate with a spiritual component.

Gene Harris describes his belief that following "natural laws" in one's daily life will help build a "storm-proof philosophic anchorage."

J. Arthur Rank expressees his faith in God and humanity and the power of faith to transform the world in to a peaceful society.

Malcolm Muggeridge, Editor of Punch Magazine, talks about the immutability, or changelessness, of life and imperfection of the human condition; however, he emphasizes the need to accept the imperfection and permanence and appreciate life for what it is and not what one hopes it may be one day.

Alfred Landon describes his belief in the ability of people to achieve monumental progress for society, and in the need to maintain a grasp of spiritual and moral truths in the midst of that progress.

Osceola Dawson describes her beliefs in the fatherhood of God, the brotherhood and equality of humanity, the Bible as the "infallible guide to conduct," and the home as "the foundation of society."