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Anne Rombeau describes her belief in the unity of nature and humanity, with each piece contributing as it freely chooses, and recounts an experience in which she overcame a physical ailment to continue her life of travel and flying. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Upton Sinclair describes the military (Navy) and religious (Episcopalian) background of his family, and his own choice to defend his country and bring change through his writing.

David Levy, Deputy District Attorney of Contra Costa County in California, describes how he learned level-headed contentment in order to survive as a POW on the Death March of Bataan during WWII.

Fred Fagg recalls a moment when his life was saved by a handhold at the edge of a cliff and uses this story to explain the importance of his own "spiritual handholds."

Paul Helms describes his work with the Ford Foundation, as well as the impact his Christian upbringing has had on his beliefs, including his belief that giving 10% of his income results in tangible blessings.

Albert Guerard describes his beliefs as a blend of old and new ideals that espouse liberty, progress, tolerance, and charity.

Joe Williams describes how sports and an escape from a plane crash have shaped his beliefs that sports reveal and develop character, and that there comes a point when events in life can no longer be changed, but rather pass "into the record" and must be accepted with calmness.

Douglas Fairbanks describes his fathers resistance to his acting career, and difficulties starting his political carreer and how he overcame obstacles through his determination.

Curt Massey talks about the importance of attending church in his life and the life of his family and how prayer and meditation allow him to better cope with stress in his life.

Bonaro Overstreet talks about her doubt and her one certain belief, that we must all act towards one another with good will and kindness because people are intimately connected and the notion of individuality is a misperception.

Lost Theaters of Somerville: Nick Riselli Interview

Interview conducted on 2/13/05 by Sam Stiegler at Oscar Greene's home in West Medford.

Lost Theaters of Somerville: Bob Hanon Interview

Waino K. Latvala, a Finnish-American, describes his experiences as an information officer fighting for Finland during the Finnish War, and how he believes that fear is a catalyst to action.

Nora Laing describes the process of how she came to believe in the immortality of the soul and in a life's purpose that extended beyond fulfilling physical needs and desires.

Clyde Rogers describes his belief that everyone is interrelated and how he came to believe this after struggling with depression from which he found relief in prayer, God and a new focus on helping others.

Martha Graham describes her belief that individuals learn through practice: just as learning to dance is achieved through difficult yet rewarding discipline, so life is learned through the process of living. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

W.C. Mullendore describes his belief that "we are here to develop the best that is within us," and how hatred impedes that goal. NOTE: This version has been abbreviated to include an advertisement after the essay. Contains advertisement for a book containing 100 "This I Believe" essays. Duplicate of the essay, complete and without the advertisement, is on XTV-18162 (Box 004).

Raymond Allen, Chancellor of UCLA, describes the impact his family had on teaching him responsibility and other beliefs such as the necessity of family and describes the beliefs he holds close, such as the importance of kindness,the perfectabiloity of man, the need for faith and freedom to worship, and the value of creativity. This essay also contains an advertisement for a This I Believe LP album.

Monroe Deustch expresses his belief that the sentiment of brotherhood between people could solve many of the world's problems and also expresses his belief that there is a greater power in the world that has created the Universe and that this power is immortal just as the spirit of people is immortal as well.

Barbarba Davenport states her belief that world peace can be achieved through a shifting of focus towards the oneness (rather than difference) of humanity.

Lee DuBridge describes his beliefs in science, both what can be understood now, and what will be explained as civilization progresses toward the future.

Rollo Peters explains his faith and wonder in people as individuals and the influence of friends on people's lives, recalling a his friendship with Edward Gordon Craig.

Wallace Stegner describes his suspicions of "passionate faith" because of the religious intolerance it creates, and recounts his beliefs in virtues such as kindness and courage, and his belief that although consciences are developed differently, based on one's birthplace, nevertheless, people across the world share many values.

William Joyce, founder of Joyce Incorporated, Shoe Manufacturers, describes how the deaths of his brother and son led him to conclude that he could only have faith in God's purposes rather than demand an explanation of His actions.

Elinor Gene Hoffman describes her belief in what Quakers call the "inner light," and how that belief led her to give up an unsatisfying career in theatre to pursue the "inner light" more fully.

Harry Dietrich describes how his family background, his teachers, and the tools and techniques invented by doctors of previous generations have all equipped him to achieve healing more effectively than ever before, and his belief that his responsibility is to help dispel fear in his patients.

George Killion remembers his father and the beliefs his farther imparted to him: compassion, respect for others, and adherence to the Golden Rule. George Killion remembers his father and the beliefs his farther imparted to him: compassion, respect for others, and adherence to the Golden Rule.

Robert Cleland, head of the Research Group of the Huntington Library, describes a time in his life in which he was distraught and took a trip along the Colorado river with friends. The beauty he saw during the trip, Robert Cleland says, reinspired his life and faith.

Alfred Nilson describes how, as a harvester in California, the only way to keep his balance while traveling on foot along the railroad ties was to focus his eyes on the distance, and he explains how this lesson in farsightedness has helped him to balance the rest of his life.

Jean Hersholt describes his belief that human relationships are "problems of arithmetic"--where there are few people, individuals realize their responsibility to help their neighbors, but in crowded areas, the responsibility is passed along to someone else--and he notes that the world would be a better place if people remembered that they were in fact neighbors.

Babara Wachner describes her belief that she can "pay in advance" for life's rewards, that hardships ultimately lead to happiness and that blessings can be met without fear of loss, because they have already been earned.

Gerald Heard describes his perspectives on moral laws and the freedoms we must obtain to achieve true contentment in our life, free of fears and anxiety.

Guy West recounts how he first became aware of the immense size of the universe, and describes his beliefs in a God who designed and provides purpose for that universe.

Asa Call describes his beliefs in moral and spiritual laws that, like the physical laws of nature, must be discovered and followed in order to succeed in life.

Dain Domich describes how momentos from his work with the Junior Commerce (a Bible and American flag) remind him of his belief that faith in God is what provides meaning to life, and his belief in American freedom and democracy.

W.C. Mullendore describes his belief that "we are here to develop the best that is within us," and how hatred impedes that goal.

Henry Houghton describes his childhood experiences of visiting his grandparents' Quaker meetings, and how those experiences led to a belief in an inner voice which provides moral direction.

Juliet Bindt describes how she came to accept her extremely poor sight, learned how to live a busy and productive life as a blind individual, and determined to help other blind individuals do the same.

Art Linkletter talks about his experiences in the entertainment industry as a host and announcer and how his focus on his own abilities, limits and performance, as well as his appreication of people, has contributed to his success.

Walter Scratch, Assistant to the Editor of the Hollywood Citizen News, describes his belief that spiritually minded people will create a good society, that societal change must start with personal responsibility, that individual religious experience is important, and that religion ought to be growing and open to change.

Milo Bekins describes his belief that society must invest in education so that the youth of today can bring the progress of tomorrow.

Frank Lloyd recounts how he met his wife through a series of events, and describes his beliefs that trying to flout God's rule leads to disappointment and regret and that human beings are created in God's image with an innate sense of religion and understanding of right and wrong.

Asa Call describes his beliefs in moral and spiritual laws that, like the physical laws of nature, must be discovered and adhered to for a successful life. NOTE: This version has been abbreviated to include an advertisement after the essay. Contains advertisement for a book containing 100 "This I Believe" essays. Duplicate of the essay, complete and without the advertisement, is on XTV-18161 (Box 004).

Jackie Robinson describes his emotional response to the integration of baseball, and states his belief that humans can and must work to overcome prejudice and dogma.

Robert Powers, writer of "Crime Was My Business," a Saturday Evening Post series, explains the value he has found in many different religions and that love, between man and God, can protect people from the uncertainty and fear they experience in life.

Aldous Huxley describes his belief that the ideal society towards which he must strive is one that reduces the number of temptations for its citizens. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Max Krone imagines looking on earth from a great distance and explains how this perspective gives him insight into the fundamental unity of man on earth.