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Hector Bolitho describes how he came to value solitude and leisure over the fear of being alone and the desire to be in constant competition with others. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Lou Crandall describes his belief that hard work brings value to our accomplishments, a belief he believes that his ancestors, the founding fathers, and architects and engineers from history all shared.

John Kelly tells the story of his disqualification from the Diamond Sculls rowing competition for having apprenticed as a bricklayer and the resulting hope to meet Beresford, the Diamond Sculls champion, in the Olympics to compete against him for the Gold Medal. Kelly concludes that he believes his failures are the most important memories he holds.

Alfred Noyes describes his belief that the complexity of the world can only be attributed to God, and that the clearest revelation of God can be found by looking at the human soul. Contains a short advertisement for This I Believe book (this essay included in the book).

Elizabeth Vining describes how she used to depend on human love for meaning and satisfaction till her husband was killed in an automobile accident, and then she came to believe in God's love and the efficacy of prayer. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Frank Dobie describes his belief in those things that make him "feel big": he believes in a supreme Being, the value of questioning to avoid blind faith, and the importance of eliminating prejudice. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

John Rothenstein, the director of the Tate Gallery in London, describes the path that led him to the Roman Catholic Churchas an adolescent and why he continues to be part of the Church.

Peter Scott describes his belief in painting and science as a means by which to discover truth, and describes the wide variety of interests that provide him a busy life.

Herbert Hodge describes his search for his own personal, practical philosophy for life: to try his best at all he does.

Jacob Bronowski describes his simultaneous introduction to mathematics and the English language, his love that developed for both subjects, and his belief in using the mind to find truth.