Search

Search Results

Stanley Unwin describes his beliefs in tolerance, reverance, beauty, liberty, justice, law, progress (despite some adjustments caused by WWI), and the happiness that can be found through work prompted by love of something.

Kenneth Boulding explains that as a quaker and an economist he understands that pure scientific knowledge is important but meaningless if unaccompanied by an appreciation for the intuitive and spiritual side of life, which he experiecnes through prayer and contemplation.

Gillie Potter states his belief in the power of wit and "foolishness" to communicate truth, and describes his belief that his task is to bring merriness back to a modern zeitgeist that is currently devoid of humor.

Lucile Watson recounts her childhood discovery of the knowledge that she could change herself for the better, and, after successes with simple things such as maintaining her hair and quitting nail-biting, she developed a philosophy for life, including a belief that God was in everything and made everything.

Lord Brabazon describes his beliefs that a divine, omnipotent Jesus is also an individual's personal link to God, that Jesus visited England, that merit should be based on intelligence or character rather than birth, that extraterrestial life does not exist, that humans have and must take responsibility for their free will, and that the English-speaking perspective and moral code is the best yet produced.

Edith Nelson talks about learning the Golden rule early in life, the impact teaching has had on her life and the importance of kindness, friends and families when struggling through adversity.

Norman Angell describes his belief that evil will triumph over good in society unless indviduals recognize their own personal capacity for evil and strive to overcome this tendency through self-discipline.

Lord Vansittart describes his belief that there is no compromise possible between good and evil, and that an individual must make a stand against evil.

Nursery school director Rose Alschuler describes the many essential beliefs she would like to impart to her children and adds that it is important for people to act on their beliefs in order to improve one's political and social life and remove cynicism.

Sir Evelyn Wrench describes how an encounter with extreme poverty shook his faith in God, and how an experience at the funeral service of King Edward VII restored that faith, as he became more inclusive in his beliefs and practices.