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J. Arthur Rank expressees his faith in God and humanity and the power of faith to transform the world in to a peaceful society.

Ahmad Zaki Abu Shadi describes his belief in freedom and justice, first developed through books, and then strengthened through his own life experiences that caused him to leave Egypt and ultimately move to the United States.

Maurice Edelman describes his youthful ideal of creating a more just society that prompted him to go into British politics, his eventual disillusionment and cynicism, and the reawakening of his ideal through a visit to the site of Struthof, a former Nazi concentration camp.

Douglas Fairbanks describes his fathers resistance to his acting career, and difficulties starting his political carreer and how he overcame obstacles through his determination.

Enseng Ho lecture entitled Burial and Travel: Islam across Indian Ocean Cultures.

Lost Theaters of Somerville: Nick Riselli Interview

Viscount Simon describes his belief that life is like a train which must come to an end at some point during the journey, but we should not view life with dread, even if he does not believe in an afterlife.

Denis Brogan explains that he doesn't share the certainty or types of belief that many adherents of world religions claim, but he does believe that love is better than hate, and that the love of friends gives meaning to life.

Reverend Irvin Underhill believes that good things can come out of adversity when one keeps faith and he recalls an experience in Africa in which fear and danger led him to peace and tranquility.

Starr Daily describes how he reversed his life from one of criminal activity based upon ill will towards society to one of responsibility based upon good will. Audio also contains an advertisement for This I Believe book, Volume II.

Hector Bolitho describes how he came to value solitude and leisure over the fear of being alone and the desire to be in constant competition with others. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Lou Crandall describes his belief that hard work brings value to our accomplishments, a belief he believes that his ancestors, the founding fathers, and architects and engineers from history all shared.

John Kelly tells the story of his disqualification from the Diamond Sculls rowing competition for having apprenticed as a bricklayer and the resulting hope to meet Beresford, the Diamond Sculls champion, in the Olympics to compete against him for the Gold Medal. Kelly concludes that he believes his failures are the most important memories he holds.

Alfred Noyes describes his belief that the complexity of the world can only be attributed to God, and that the clearest revelation of God can be found by looking at the human soul. Contains a short advertisement for This I Believe book (this essay included in the book).

Elizabeth Vining describes how she used to depend on human love for meaning and satisfaction till her husband was killed in an automobile accident, and then she came to believe in God's love and the efficacy of prayer. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

Frank Dobie describes his belief in those things that make him "feel big": he believes in a supreme Being, the value of questioning to avoid blind faith, and the importance of eliminating prejudice. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

John Rothenstein, the director of the Tate Gallery in London, describes the path that led him to the Roman Catholic Churchas an adolescent and why he continues to be part of the Church.

Peter Scott describes his belief in painting and science as a means by which to discover truth, and describes the wide variety of interests that provide him a busy life.

Herbert Hodge describes his search for his own personal, practical philosophy for life: to try his best at all he does.

Jacob Bronowski describes his simultaneous introduction to mathematics and the English language, his love that developed for both subjects, and his belief in using the mind to find truth.

Stanley Unwin describes his beliefs in tolerance, reverance, beauty, liberty, justice, law, progress (despite some adjustments caused by WWI), and the happiness that can be found through work prompted by love of something.

Kenneth Boulding explains that as a quaker and an economist he understands that pure scientific knowledge is important but meaningless if unaccompanied by an appreciation for the intuitive and spiritual side of life, which he experiecnes through prayer and contemplation.

Gillie Potter states his belief in the power of wit and "foolishness" to communicate truth, and describes his belief that his task is to bring merriness back to a modern zeitgeist that is currently devoid of humor.

Lucile Watson recounts her childhood discovery of the knowledge that she could change herself for the better, and, after successes with simple things such as maintaining her hair and quitting nail-biting, she developed a philosophy for life, including a belief that God was in everything and made everything.

Lord Brabazon describes his beliefs that a divine, omnipotent Jesus is also an individual's personal link to God, that Jesus visited England, that merit should be based on intelligence or character rather than birth, that extraterrestial life does not exist, that humans have and must take responsibility for their free will, and that the English-speaking perspective and moral code is the best yet produced.

Edith Nelson talks about learning the Golden rule early in life, the impact teaching has had on her life and the importance of kindness, friends and families when struggling through adversity.

Norman Angell describes his belief that evil will triumph over good in society unless indviduals recognize their own personal capacity for evil and strive to overcome this tendency through self-discipline.

Lord Vansittart describes his belief that there is no compromise possible between good and evil, and that an individual must make a stand against evil.

Nursery school director Rose Alschuler describes the many essential beliefs she would like to impart to her children and adds that it is important for people to act on their beliefs in order to improve one's political and social life and remove cynicism.

Sir Evelyn Wrench describes how an encounter with extreme poverty shook his faith in God, and how an experience at the funeral service of King Edward VII restored that faith, as he became more inclusive in his beliefs and practices.

George Strickling recounts how the rowdiness of a regiment of American soldiers in England limited his own freedom to sight-see as a soldier, and describes his belief in good manners.

Christmas Humphreys recounts his search for beliefs that he could live by, and states his beliefs in the Four Noble Truths of Buddhism.

Louis MacNeice defines beliefs as statements of personal preference, and describes his belief that the world can avoid anarchism because people share many of the same preferences, including the desire to build an orderly society.

Henry Murray describes his belief that the world will not be able to progress and escape the threat of atomic war until a synthesized philosophy of eastern and western ideals can be adopted by thousands, and a world government achieved.

Hudson Hoagland describes the importance of science and democracy and how they work together.

Kate Holliday describes her beliefs in the brotherhood of humanity, in the right to freedom of worship, and in the Golden rule.

Lord Oaksey emphasizes the importance of keeping one's values strong but simple so that they may remain solid, and also to be conscious of right and wrong, and also to be aware of opportunity or "luck," then concludes with a poem by Adam Lindsey Gordon.

Robert Stacy-Judd relates an experience from early in his career when unemployment left him homeless and in despair; however, rather than taking his own life, he had the opportunity to prevent another from committing suicide, establishing his faith in divine help, prayer, and a sense of humor.

Violet Bonham Carter describes her Prime Minister father's influence on her life; and states her belief in the "absolute value of truth," in the diverse means (religion, philosophy, poetry, nature) of arriving at that truth, and in the courage to think honestly.

Lost Theaters of Somerville: Ruth Stott Interview

Peter Ustinov describes his belief that organized religion is oppressive, and that doubt, liberalism, the individual, moral courage, and the privacy of the human conscience are all essential to avoid religious oppression.

Aldous Huxley describes his belief that the ideal society towards which he must strive is one that reduces the number of temptations for its citizens. This episode is a rebroadcast of an earlier airing.

William Dalrymple lecture entitled "Return of a King: Shah Shuja and the First Anglo-Afghan War 1839-42"

Margery Fry describes her belief in both Schweitzers reverence for life as well as a "reverence for truth" and how application of these beliefs will lead to the self's service to the "not-self" (other people).

Charles Wilson, Sir Winston Churchill's personal physician, recounts how one judged a person during World War I and the importance of altruism and selflessness to determining a person's character.

Edwin Gerschefski describes how he realized that both his beliefs and compositional style were really the products of other people's thoughts, and he recounts how he came to discover and listen to his own voice.

Lord Casson describes his appreciation and preference for the simple pleasures he derives from life, art and family, and expresses his relative disinterest in religion and politics.

Robert Travers, Assoc. Professor, Department of History, Cornell University. Lecture entitled "The Connected World of Haji Mustapha: an informer to the British in eighteenth century Bengal"

Partha Chatterjee lecture entitled "Early Modern Absolutism in 18th Century India"

Interview conducted 2/25/05 at the Baptist Church, W. Springfield by Gwynne Langley and Toryn Miller-Stevens. Present were Lois Pinton, Toryn Miller-Stevens and Gwynne Langley.